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47:44 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

July 12, 2020  |  Nine

Super Splurge As important as everyone knows superannuation is, the mere mention of the word, particularly among younger generations, used to be a sure-fire guarantee of glazed eyes and stifled yawns. But workers around the country woke up when the financial hit of coronavirus COVID-19 led the government to announce retirement savings of tomorrow could be used to pay the bills of today. More than 2 million Australians have so far found salvation in their super by cashing in as much as $20,000 each. Of course, the money is desperately needed by many, but for others it seems to be an excuse to splurge. And as desirable as designer handbags, new cars and new boobs might be right now, are they really worth more than a comfortable old age? RIP Hong Kong Rest in peace Hong Kong. It might seem over the top to say it, but according to thousands of worried residents, the once thriving hub of Asia is now all but dead. They blame the heavy-handed tactics of the Chinese Communist Party for their city's demise. The Beijing regime has imposed a strict national security law which not only strips Hong Kong of its autonomy but also severely restricts democratic freedoms. Anyone breaking the law faces life imprisonment. The draconian takeover has been condemned around the world with countries including Australia warning its citizens to stay away from the troubled region. However, as Liam Bartlett reports, that's only strengthening the resolve of the increasingly belligerent Chinese leadership. Wrongs and Rights For victims of sexual assault, recovery is often long and torturous. But some women face even more trauma when they find out they are pregnant to their attacker. Every year in the US about 10,000 babies are born as a result of rape. In these situations, the natural assumption is that all compassion, as well as all legal rights, rest with the victim and her child. But as Liam Bartlett discovers, that's not the case in several states where outdated laws mean an increasing number of American rapists are legally applying for, and being granted, custody rights over these children. Thankfully though, there are courageous women fighting to change these crazy laws.

50:40 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

July 5, 2020  |  Nine

Right Hand Woman There was little Jeffrey Epstein wouldn't do to satisfy his lust for young women and girls. It included spending millions of dollars masterminding a worldwide sex-trafficking operation. Countless innocent lives were destroyed. A year ago Epstein was arrested and a month later he died in custody. Investigators though refused to let this scandal go to the grave with him. Instead they shifted their attention to his high-profile friends. One of them is the Queen's son, Prince Andrew, who continues to dodge requests from the FBI for an interview. But late this week there was a significant breakthrough in the case with the arrest of socialite Ghislaine Maxwell. She's accused of being Epstein's right-hand woman and has been charged with multiple child sex offences. As Tara Brown reports, for the first time in a long time, the victims in this wicked saga are feeling relief rather than terror. Money for Nothing Australians are generous. In a crisis we're happy to donate money or provide a helping hand to those who need it. It's a kindness that is recognised around the world and was well and truly on display in the aftermath of last summer's shocking bushfires when hundreds of millions of dollars was given to charities to help those who'd suffered. But six months on much of the money remains undistributed, which is causing bitterness in many fire-ravaged communities. Victims who lost their homes and are now struggling through winter living in caravans and tents feel like they've been forgotten. But the charities say there's a reason for the delay: that it takes time to ensure the claims are legitimate, especially when there are so many people accused of wanting money for nothing. In a special investigation for 60 Minutes, Tom Steinfort confronts those allegedly cashing in our generosity.

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