Series: 7.30

India claims a dramatic win 
Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil.
Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day.
Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy?
Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle.

Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla
It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla.

Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash 
The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing.

What is the future of Australia's housing market?
For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.

7.30: December 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:43
India claims a dramatic win Despite dogged resistance from Australia's tail, India has taken an historic early lead in the four Test series after snatching victory in the opening match by 31 runs. It's just the sixth time India has won a Test on Australian soil. Commentator Andrew Moore takes a look at a dramatic final day. Are we overlooking the role of the public sector in the economy? Mariana Mazzucato is something of a rockstar in the world of global economics. She's written two best-sellers arguing that it's actually the public sector which has made the crucial investments that have transformed the world economy. In Australia for a series of public lectures, she sat down to talk with Laura Tingle. Sanjeev Gupta unveils plans for Whyalla It's rare to see the Prime Minister and Opposition leader at the same press conference, but both were present in South Australia today as British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta unveiled his plans for a massive new steelworks project that will revive the town of Whyalla. Remembering the 1966 helicopter crash The 11th of December marks the anniversary of a tragic accident over Sydney Harbour that changed our aviation safety laws. On that day in 1966 a helicopter chartered by the ABC ran into technical problems mid flight and crashed into the Sydney CBD. Remarkably the accident was filmed by two cameras, including one capturing the haunting last moments inside the ill-fated helicopter. And a warning, this report contains images some viewers may find distressing. What is the future of Australia's housing market? For years it seemed that property prices would rise for ever. But not any more. We are now in what the Reserve Bank governor has called "uncharted territory", where property prices are falling in our two biggest cities, even though unemployment is stable and the economy is growing.
Major parties clash over discrimination bill
The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat.

Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self
When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series.

Chris Dawson 
Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago.
 
Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry
Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC.
Closing Europe's biggest steel works
In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.

7.30: December 5, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:36
Major parties clash over discrimination bill The second last day of federal parliament for the year and the level of frenzy rose considerably. Asylum seekers, energy and the economy were all being debated, but it was the issue of discrimination against gay students attending religious schools, that had the government and opposition in fiercest combat. Ita Buttrose gives advice to her younger self When Ita Buttrose started Cleo magazine in 1972, it was the first time a women's publication was frank about sexuality and it went on to become a huge success. That was just the beginning for a woman who's paved the way for women in journalism ever since. Now Ita Buttrose shares her wisdom in our 'advice to my younger self' series. Chris Dawson Renee Simms, the niece of Lynette Dawson, talks about the arrest of Chris Murphy, who is expected to be charged with the murder of his wife 36 years ago. Reverse mortgages leaving the elderly high and dry Reverse mortgages are touted as a way to unlock equity in the family home by borrowing against the asset without needing to make repayments until the house is sold or the owner moves out or dies. But a number of banks, including Australia's biggest lender the Commonwealth Bank, are now getting out of the reverse mortgage market, in the face of criticism from the peak financial regulator, ASIC. Closing Europe's biggest steel works In the south of Italy, a major corruption trial is underway that is pitting a local community against Europe's biggest steelworks, the Ilva plant in Taranto. The pollution from the plant is so bad it has been blamed in official government reports for the deaths of almost 400 local residents. The former owners of the company have been accused of crimes against public safety.
Malcolm Turnbull 
There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection.
ABC journalist 
There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms.

Gangland investigations
The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions.

What is it like being a parent with a disability?
When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities.

7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings
One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings.

Former US President George HW Bush dies
This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.

7.30: December 3, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:21
Malcolm Turnbull There is only one week left of parliament but it is going to be a long week for the Prime Minister. The Liberal party's bitter in-fighting is continuing with the former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull weighing in to a controversial pre-selection. ABC journalist There's been a lot of focus on women in politics lately and, adding to some of the controversy, today ABC journalist Patricia Karvelas was ejected from Parliament's press gallery. Her crime? Wearing a top which showed too much of her arms. Gangland investigations The Victorian Premier has announced a Royal Commission into the way police have handled several high profile gangland investigations, after suppression orders were lifted on a case which showed Victoria Police had recruited a criminal lawyer to report on her own clients. Crime reporter and author, Andrew Rule, says some of the state's most notorious criminals including drug lord Tony Mokbel could now appeal against their convictions. What is it like being a parent with a disability? When ABC producer Eliza Hull became pregnant with her daughter, she took a crash course in parenting. As a person with disability, she found the available information often patronising and inaccurate. So she set out to share the genuine experiences of parents with disabilities. 7.30 takes a look at Stuart Robert's business dealings One of the newer members of Scott Morrison's new ministry is Stuart Robert, the assistant treasurer. He serves in one of the most important roles in government, overseeing the corporate watchdog ASIC. It's a big comeback after his resignation from Malcolm Turnbull's ministry in 2016 but he's found himself at the centre of some unwanted attention in recent months over some of his business dealings. Former US President George HW Bush dies This week the body of former president George Bush will lie in state in the U.S. capitol building ahead of a state funeral on Thursday.
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires
It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate
Brexit looms
British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany.
Kerryn Phelps
The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru.
My Health Record
The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy.
Minority government
It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look.
Satirist Mark Humphries
The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.

7.30: November 29, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:31
Catastrophic Queensland bushfires It's been a catastrophic start to the bushfire season in Queensland with record temperatures and unprecedented fires. Authorities are warning there are least 5 more days of extreme weather ahead and there are still more than 100 fires still burning, mainly in central Queensland, forcing more communities to evacuate Brexit looms British politics is swirling over whether the Prime Minister's Brexit deal will be rejected by the parliament and whether the country will be forced to hold a second referendum. But while the politicians battle it out, the looming deadline is having an unexpected impact on one particular group - families that fled Nazi Germany. Kerryn Phelps The new independent member for Wentworth, Dr Kerryn Phelps has wasted no time in making her presence felt in Canberra, introducing a private member's bill to remove children from detention in Nauru. My Health Record The government has extended the 'my health record' opt out deadline to the end of January. And it's been busy making some changes to the system to address peoples' concerns about privacy. Minority government It's been a wild first week of minority government in Canberra, ending with the government narrowly surviving a test of its numbers in the House of Representatives. Chief political correspondent Laura Tingle takes a look. Satirist Mark Humphries The Prime Minister has denounced a strike for action on climate change organised by school children. Now 7.30 has obtained a video message from the Coalition to the students, courtesy of satirist Mark Humphries.
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires
More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton.

Cullen Group 
The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices.

 Julia Banks 
The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget.

Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers
When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution?

Missy Higgins 
Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.

7.30: November 28, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:55
Catastrophic Queensland Bushfires More than 130 bushfires are burning across Queensland and 8,000 residents of Gracemere have been advised to evacuate their homes. Local MP Brittany Lauga describes the situation around Rockhampton. Cullen Group The building industry is coming under increasing scrutiny with investigations into two recent company collapses. In one instance the Queensland building regulator brushed aside warning signs that one of those companies was in deep financial trouble nine months before it went into liquidation. And there are increasing calls on the federal corporate regulator, ASIC, to intervene and stamp out illegal practices. Julia Banks The government has spent the day cleaning up after yesterday's shock resignation of Julia Banks from the Liberal Party and her move to the crossbenches. And it defended its decision to have just 10 sitting days before next year's budget. Australia facing battle over quality and quantity of teachers When you send your kids to school, you want them to be educated by the best and brightest teachers but attracting and keeping those people is a major challenge. Australia has looming teacher shortage combined with a booming student population. So, what's the solution? Missy Higgins Over the course of her career, singer-songwriter Missy Higgins has had many hits and won a swag of awards. But it hasn't always been that way, and here she offers her younger self some advice.
Victorian election
The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold.

Silicosis outbreak
Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce.

How much do political parties know about you?
Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge.

Jarrod Lyle's legacy
In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge.

Labor's new energy policy
For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.

7.30: November 22, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:47
Victorian election The Andrews Labor government is fighting hold onto power in Victoria in this weekend's state election. The ABC's election analyst, Antony Green, takes a look at how things may unfold. Silicosis outbreak Over the past three months, 7.30 has revealed a health crisis among workers cutting artificial stone kitchen benchtops. Dozens of cases of the potentially deadly lung disease silicosis were first identified in Queensland, before even more cases emerged in New South Wales, the ACT and Victoria. It has now become so bad an international health expert has called for urgent medical testing of the entire workforce. How much do political parties know about you? Political parties know more about you than you may realise. Parties are looking for whatever edge they can get, and increasingly, that edge comes in the form of personal data. While the use of this data is still in its infancy in this country, its potential is huge. Jarrod Lyle's legacy In August Australian golfer Jarrod Lyle lost his third battle against a cancer he was first diagnosed with two decades earlier. His death shocked both the other professionals and his many fans. His widow Briony is continuing her husband's work raising money for families living with cancer through the charity, Challenge. Labor's new energy policy For more than a decade, energy policy has been a headache for both sides of politics. Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy Mark Butler discusses Labor's newly unveiled the energy policy, which they will take to the next election.
Illegal Logging
Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria.

The fall of small mechanics
The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing.

New activist group to challenge Get Up!
A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing.

Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self
As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates.

Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy
Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.

7.30: November 21, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:35
Illegal Logging Government-owned logging company, VicForest has been accused of illegally logging in endangered ecosystems. That logging is contributing to the decline of some of the country's threatened species and destroying some of the last untouched forests in Victoria. The fall of small mechanics The car you probably driving today is in effect a highly sophisticated computer and that means fixing cars requires technical information and computer codes. Australia's consumer watchdog, the ACCC, has found that car makers are often reluctant to share that information, pushing up the price of repairs and servicing. New activist group to challenge Get Up! A new activist group wants to influence your vote at the next election and is throwing a lot of money at it. Advance Australia has been started by a group of conservative business leaders on a mission to challenge the powerful left-wing lobby group, Get Up!rs and servicing. Cate McGregor's advice to her younger self As part of our series of Australians offering advice to their younger selves, Cate McGregor looks back on her eclectic career in the military, politics and cricket. She is also now one of Australia's highest-profile transgender advocates. Celebrating 50 years of life with muscular dystrophy Turning 50 is a big deal for anyone, but it's especially significant for Andrew Taylor. At seven he was diagnosed with a form of muscular dystrophy, and doctors didn't expect him to live much beyond his teens.
Inside Lion Air's crash investigation
Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong.
At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight.
Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia
Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal.

Controversial gas project divides dying outback town
When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled.
Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned.

Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video.

Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor
Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)

7.30: November 1, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:55
Inside Lion Air's crash investigation Indonesian air safety investigators have recovered one of the flight recorders from the Lion Air plane crash, moving a step closer to finding out what went wrong. At the same time, Lion Air is conducting its own investigation . 7.30 was granted access to the airline's training facility – as the accident-prone airline attempts to recreate what went wrong during Monday's fateful flight. Gideon Haigh explains why David Peever had to resign as Chairman of Cricket Australia Cricket commentator and author, Gideon Haigh, discusses the resignation of David Peever as Chairman of Cricket Australia. It follows a week of pressure over the fallout from the ball tampering scandal. Controversial gas project divides dying outback town When South Australia's only coal fired power station closed in 2015 hundreds of jobs were lost and the small community where the coal came from was crippled. Now a new gas project is offering the outback town of Leigh Creek a lifeline. The problem is the technology promising a new future has a problematic past in Queensland, where it's been banned. Satirist Mark Humphries takes us behind the scenes to show us how to make a Prime Ministerial video. Back out of the closet and onto the dance floor Hundreds of members of the LGBTI community have gathered in central Melbourne for the second 'Coming Back Out Ball', which celebrates those who led the charge out of the closet. But behind the glitz and glamour, the event also addresses issues of social isolation, ageism and homophobia. (Picture supplied: Bryony Jackson/All the Queens Men)
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump'
With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda.
Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students
This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom.
Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer
Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman.
The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia
Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat.
The incredible reality for young carers
One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.

7.30: October 31, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:41
Meet the Kansas governor candidate described as 'Trump before Trump' With US mid-term elections on next week, Republicans are desperately trying to hold onto their majority as Democrats gain ground in traditionally conservative states. As well as voting for Congress, they're deciding the Governorships of their states. And this year all eyes are on the race in Kansas, where Kris Kobach, a man described as a 'mini Trump' is running on an anti-immigrant agenda. Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom for Year 12 students This week 7.30 has heard from some wonderful Australians offering advice for year 12 students sitting end of school exams. In the final instalment, former High Court Judge Michael Kirby shares his wisdom. Grieving dad fulfils triathlon promise to wife and son who died of brain cancer Leigh Chivers lost both his wife, Sara, and son, Alfie, to brain cancer within six months of each other. Now he's fulfilled a promise he made to his wife and also a life long dream, by completing the gruelling Hawaiian Ironman. The real cost of becoming a cashless Australia Carrying cash is fast becoming a thing of the past. While digital payments are more convenient for many of us, it's making life difficult for buskers, the homeless and charities who collect on the streets. The Salvation Army has adopted paypass, and The Big Issue magazine is about to switch to tap-n-go in a bid to stay afloat. The incredible reality for young carers One in eight people in Australia are carers for family members who are sick, disabled, frail or have an addiction. And it's not just adults, more than 275,000 Australian children are caring for parents or siblings. They're juggling burdens that would be challenging for adults to manage and, as a consequence, they face a serious risk of long-term disadvantage.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
Conflict over religious freedom report threatens to split Coalition
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
James Clapper assesses tension in the South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Spike in silicosis cases
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 11, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:47
Conflict over religious freedom report threatens to split Coalition The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. James Clapper assesses tension in the South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Spike in silicosis cases Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
Religious Freedom
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Deadly dust
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:07
Religious Freedom The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Deadly dust Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard?
The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'.
Bill Hare discusses climate change report
The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means.
Alison Harcourt
Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students.
Cable Beach
It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.

7.30: October 8, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:35
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard? The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'. Bill Hare discusses climate change report The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means. Alison Harcourt Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students. Cable Beach It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks?
The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned.
 
Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools.
 
Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer
This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable.
 
The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia
Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle.
 
Roadies, a look at life on the road
Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.

7.30: September 20, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:53
How do you keep people safe from dog attacks? The death of a toddler last month has reignited the debate about how to keep people safe from dogs. The RSPCA says training and education is the answer, but others want aggressive dogs banned. Laura Tingle on the $4.5bn extra funding for Catholic and independent schools Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced $4.5 billion in extra funding for Catholic and independent schools. Behind the lens of Parliament's prize photographer This year, for the first time in history, the press gallery journalist of the year award went to a photographer, Alex Ellinghausen. He works for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and while you may not know his name the chances are you'll recognise his work - capturing politicians at their best, their worst and their most vulnerable. The battle for control of powerlifting in Australia Parliament house isn't the only place where you'll find politics. Pretty much any organisation, no matter how big or small, will at some stage become captive to people jockeying for power. The sport of powerlifting in Australia is a case in point, with two local federations vying for control - and the athletes caught in the middle. Roadies, a look at life on the road Behind every world-conquering band is a road crew that transports them from gig to gig, ensures they look and sound amazing, and literally works around the clock to keep the show on the road. Music writer Stuart Coupe's latest book, Roadies – The Secret History of Australian Rock'n'Roll, is a fascinating look at the often hidden side of the music business.
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster
Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars.
 
Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics?
A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra.
 
Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics
Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women.
 
Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour
Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history.
 
Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet
Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.

7.30: September 19, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
30:05
Authorities fear copy-cat tampering in fruit contamination disaster Since the story strawberry tampering broke more than 100 reports of contaminated fruit have been made around the country, sparking fears of copy-cat tampering. Authorities are scrambling to manage this slow-moving disaster as they try to limit the damage to an industry worth almost half a billion dollars. Why are female Liberal MPs quitting Federal politics? A number of female Liberal MPs have spoken out against internal party dynamics, while also announcing they won’t recontest the next election. But Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisting there is not a behaviour problem in Canberra. Christian Porter discusses strawberry tampering and sexism in politics Federal Attorney General, Christian Porter, talks to 7.30 about news laws introduced to counter the growing strawberry tampering crisis, and whether the Liberal Party has a problem with women. Marine archaeologists may have discovered the wreck of the Endeavour Historian David Hunt explains why the discovery of Capt. James Cook's ship, HMS Endeavour, would be an important moment in Australia's history. Meet Alec Knight, the first Australian male to join the New York City Ballet Alec Knight was just 17 when he moved to New York after being offered a coveted apprenticeship with the New York City Ballet. That was five years ago. Now he's the first Australian male to be given a contract with the prestigious ballet company.
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash?
This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price.
 
Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week
The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed.
 
Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012
Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes.
 
Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit
Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit.
 
Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes
Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.

7.30: September 13, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
32:16
Ten years on from the GFC are we heading for another crash? This week marks a decade since the collapse of the US investment bank Lehman Brothers triggered the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression. While much of the world fell into prolonged recession, Australia's economy narrowly avoided that fate but 10 years on, many individual Australians are still paying the price. Phil Coorey reviews the Morrison government's first parliamentary week The Morrison Governments' first parliamentary week has done little to settle the dust after the downfall of Malcolm Turnbull three weeks ago. The AFR's chief political correspondent, Phil Coorey looks at how it has performed. Sydney light rail project won't break-even, NSW Cabinet told in 2012 Over time, and over budget, Sydney's floundering light rail project is wreaking havoc on businesses and commuters in the country's largest city. Leaked NSW cabinet documents point to a political culture where economic caution is thrown out the window in the rush to approve expensive and ultimately disruptive schemes. Search on for Australia's next big diamond deposit Of all the minerals dug out of the ground, diamonds have a special allure and Australia produces some of the most sought-after stones in the world. But the nation's sole operating diamond mine is on the verge of closure. That's led to a flurry of exploration to find a new diamond deposit. Technology offering blind people the chance to borrow someone else's eyes Imagine borrowing the eyes of someone on the other side of the world. That's what technology is now offering more than half a million Australians who are blind or vision impaired, via free, and paid, apps on their smart phones.
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government
Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies.
 
Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman
Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband.
 
Can women change the political culture?
The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change?
 
Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families
Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.

7.30: September 12, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:01
Banned Chinese cameras are being used by the Australian Government Security cameras made by Chinese surveillance companies are also being used at a series of classified facilities including an Adelaide Air Force base and a Canberra office block home to an annexe of the nation's intelligence agencies. Lynette Dawson's niece, Renee Sims, and journalist Hedley Thomas discuss new search for missing woman Renee Simms, niece of missing woman Lyn Dawson, and Hedley Thomas, the journalist behind the Teacher's Pet podcast, discuss today's news that police are digging at the former property of Lyn Dawson and her husband. Can women change the political culture? The treatment of women in politics has been a hot subject of debate in recent months with allegations of slut shaming, and during the Liberals' leadership turmoil, accusations of bullying and bad behaviour. The big question is, will anything really change? Cerebral palsy treatment creating an international bond of friendship between two families Last year we told the story about Max Shearman whose dad Michael carried the then six-year-old along the gruelling Kokoda track to raise money for a trial of technology called a TheraSuit. While the pair was on that mission, they built a relationship with a local Papua New Guinea family also searching for help with their daughter's cerebral palsy diagnosis. That family recently travelled to Melbourne for three weeks of intensive treatment.
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