Series: Landline

Rural News
A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.
Heywire: Muriel
Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream
Defying the Drought
A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them.
Hall of Fame
The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012.
Open Sesame
Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential.
Markets Report
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.
Farm Tech
Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.

Landline: August 12, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:15
Rural News A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Muriel Muriel Hunter had a tragic start to life and struggled in school, but now she's fulfilling her dream Defying the Drought A large part of eastern Australia is drought declared, and the big dry is hitting farmers and communities hard. But some farmers seem to be defying the drought. Marty McCarthy hits the road to meet them. Hall of Fame The rural press club honour is awarded to Queensland-based journalists who have made a significant contribution to the profession for more than 20 years and have helped support the next generation of rural journalists. Pip has been a reporter on the ABC’s flagship rural current affairs program Landline for the past 25 years and its host since 2012. Open Sesame Farmers and scientists in central Queensland have just trialled the country’s first commercial crop of black sesame seed and early results are showing great potential. Markets Report Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Farm Tech Farmers have partnered with programmers, engineers and inventors to help make farming more efficient. It’s part of a University ‘Tech-Connect’ program and together they’ve come up with some very creative solutions to some everyday on-farm problems.
Help from Above: The aero-medical specialists saving lives in the Top End
From a single helicopter operation in 1986, the ‘Careflight’ aero-medical charity has evolved to play a crucial role in Australia’s Health System. With crews who are ‘prepared for anything’, its work across remote regions of the Top End regularly mean the difference between life and death.

Rosellas: An old-fashioned favourite back in favour
A farming family on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast is growing one of the few commercial rosella crops in the country, and the old-fashioned favourite is winning over plenty of new fans.

Feijoas: Australian growers embrace the little known feijoa fruit
They look a little like small avocados, with a flavour that’s a cross between other fruits such as pineapple, guava and strawberry. Feijoa are not very well known in Australia but as the fruit’s popularity increases, so do the number of plantings.

Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan
Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan.

Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week

A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week.

Heywire: Nia
Nia has grown up surrounded by successful, strong, deaf women and has a profound message to share.

Landline: Help From Above/Rosellas/Feijoas/ Markets Report/Rural News/Heywire

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:04
Help from Above: The aero-medical specialists saving lives in the Top End From a single helicopter operation in 1986, the ‘Careflight’ aero-medical charity has evolved to play a crucial role in Australia’s Health System. With crews who are ‘prepared for anything’, its work across remote regions of the Top End regularly mean the difference between life and death. Rosellas: An old-fashioned favourite back in favour A farming family on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast is growing one of the few commercial rosella crops in the country, and the old-fashioned favourite is winning over plenty of new fans. Feijoas: Australian growers embrace the little known feijoa fruit They look a little like small avocados, with a flavour that’s a cross between other fruits such as pineapple, guava and strawberry. Feijoa are not very well known in Australia but as the fruit’s popularity increases, so do the number of plantings. Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan. Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week. Heywire: Nia Nia has grown up surrounded by successful, strong, deaf women and has a profound message to share.
Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan

Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week

Heywire: Lucy
Lucy is from the Riverina region of New South Wales. Her large Italian family is about to embark on their annual 'salami day'. Heywire puts young Australians at the centre of the conversations that shape their communities. 

Kalette: A vegetable grower takes sprouts to the next levels
A third generation brussels sprouts farmer has been named Grower of the Year by the horticulture industry. Adelaide Hills producer Scott Samwell has taken the little cabbage to the next level by growing sweeter and coloured varieties. He’s also introduced a new vegetable to the Australian market - the ‘kalette’ - a cross between a green sprout and red kale.

Brown Gold: A surprising ingredient helping to drought-proof properties
Farmers in the central west of New South Wales have a surprising solution to help deal with drought. It's human sewage, treated and dewatered to produce biosolids, and the organic fertiliser is transforming about 30 farms in the region.

Ocean Giant: A successful breeding program for Queensland groper
A Queensland scientist and his team have successfully commercialised a breeding program for ‘Queensland groper’ and fingerlings are now being exported to Asia.

Landline: July 8, 2018

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:59
Markets Report: Market activity and analysis with Kerry Lonergan Rural News: A look at rural and regional issues making the news this week Heywire: Lucy Lucy is from the Riverina region of New South Wales. Her large Italian family is about to embark on their annual 'salami day'. Heywire puts young Australians at the centre of the conversations that shape their communities. Kalette: A vegetable grower takes sprouts to the next levels A third generation brussels sprouts farmer has been named Grower of the Year by the horticulture industry. Adelaide Hills producer Scott Samwell has taken the little cabbage to the next level by growing sweeter and coloured varieties. He’s also introduced a new vegetable to the Australian market - the ‘kalette’ - a cross between a green sprout and red kale. Brown Gold: A surprising ingredient helping to drought-proof properties Farmers in the central west of New South Wales have a surprising solution to help deal with drought. It's human sewage, treated and dewatered to produce biosolids, and the organic fertiliser is transforming about 30 farms in the region. Ocean Giant: A successful breeding program for Queensland groper A Queensland scientist and his team have successfully commercialised a breeding program for ‘Queensland groper’ and fingerlings are now being exported to Asia.
Pastured Chickens
A farmer who spent several years working in sustainable agricultural policy at federal level is now pursuing his dream of putting innovative principles into practice. His award-winning family run farm takes a 'regenerative' approach to farming that aims to produce food which is good for the animal, good for the land and good for the plate.

Write Stuff
Rural romance novels - 'lust in the dust' - set on farms and stations in the outback have been a phenomenon in Australian fiction in recent years. But there's a new trend for authors championing our regional towns, and the familiarity of small-town living is really connecting with readers.

Cutting Through
A low-volume livestock producer started his own abattoir when he couldn't obtain the standard of service he expected from existing providers. Now, his abattoir and meat processing works employs five people, and provides a custom service to similar minded farmers invested in the way their livestock is processed.

Postcode Blues
Sharing a postcode with a densely populated urban centre almost 200km away is a cause of frustration for the residents of one rural region in Queensland. Farmers find it inhibits their ability to attract necessary backpacker workers, while other residents say it impacts on everything from increased insurance premiums to accessing government services.

Landline: Pastured Chickens/Write Stuff/Cutting Through/Postcode Blues

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
58:27
Pastured Chickens A farmer who spent several years working in sustainable agricultural policy at federal level is now pursuing his dream of putting innovative principles into practice. His award-winning family run farm takes a 'regenerative' approach to farming that aims to produce food which is good for the animal, good for the land and good for the plate. Write Stuff Rural romance novels - 'lust in the dust' - set on farms and stations in the outback have been a phenomenon in Australian fiction in recent years. But there's a new trend for authors championing our regional towns, and the familiarity of small-town living is really connecting with readers. Cutting Through A low-volume livestock producer started his own abattoir when he couldn't obtain the standard of service he expected from existing providers. Now, his abattoir and meat processing works employs five people, and provides a custom service to similar minded farmers invested in the way their livestock is processed. Postcode Blues Sharing a postcode with a densely populated urban centre almost 200km away is a cause of frustration for the residents of one rural region in Queensland. Farmers find it inhibits their ability to attract necessary backpacker workers, while other residents say it impacts on everything from increased insurance premiums to accessing government services.
Wild At Heart
Cattlemen and women in the Top End are dusting off the bullcatchers and heading off into the scrub to catch buffalo. Until recently, the wild buffalo haven't been worth the cost and effort to muster, but high cattle prices mean it's now a cheap protein source - ideal for live export into Asia.

State Of Origin
A multimillion-dollar citrus orchard in Western Australia's wheatbelt is providing home grown oranges for the state and helping to future-proof a local community.

On the (Dirt) Road
Darwin reporter Kristy O'Brien and cameraman Ian "Jumbuck" Redfearn spend a lot of hours together on the (dirt) road for Landline. They documented their recent trip to the Aboriginal community of Ngukurr to give us a behind-the-scenes look at making television in a remote part of Australia.

Heywire
The culling and commercial harvest of kangaroos can be a divisive topic often sparking debate. But for those who do it, it's also a job. This week we meet Kyle on a roo cull in the wheatbelt region of WA. (Graphic vision)

Herdy Gerdy
Alpaca farming in Australia has grown from a hobby based interest to a vibrant live export industry worth millions of dollars. Pedigree genetics and fibre are in global demand, but an emerging meat business could be what's needed to secure a reliable income stream.

Landline: Wild At Heart/State Of Origin/On the (Dirt) Road/Heywire/Herdy Gerdy

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
58:59
Wild At Heart Cattlemen and women in the Top End are dusting off the bullcatchers and heading off into the scrub to catch buffalo. Until recently, the wild buffalo haven't been worth the cost and effort to muster, but high cattle prices mean it's now a cheap protein source - ideal for live export into Asia. State Of Origin A multimillion-dollar citrus orchard in Western Australia's wheatbelt is providing home grown oranges for the state and helping to future-proof a local community. On the (Dirt) Road Darwin reporter Kristy O'Brien and cameraman Ian "Jumbuck" Redfearn spend a lot of hours together on the (dirt) road for Landline. They documented their recent trip to the Aboriginal community of Ngukurr to give us a behind-the-scenes look at making television in a remote part of Australia. Heywire The culling and commercial harvest of kangaroos can be a divisive topic often sparking debate. But for those who do it, it's also a job. This week we meet Kyle on a roo cull in the wheatbelt region of WA. (Graphic vision) Herdy Gerdy Alpaca farming in Australia has grown from a hobby based interest to a vibrant live export industry worth millions of dollars. Pedigree genetics and fibre are in global demand, but an emerging meat business could be what's needed to secure a reliable income stream.
Bio d Vino
Filling cow horns with manure and burying them for six months sounds strange, but for biodynamic farmers, it's the basis of their approach to agriculture. The philosophy has skeptics, but Sean Murphy meets some viticulturalists producing award winning wines by following the mysterious principles.

Grains Outlook
The outlook for the coming season was on the agenda at the Grains Industry Conference this week. While dry conditions across much of the grain belt could slash the size of the national crop by a third - it's not gloom and doom just yet.

Heywire
Grenfell in Western NSW is the birthplace of Henry Lawson and home to the Happy Inn Chinese restaurant.

The Paperman
An artisan in north-west Tasmania is making paper from poo. As well as scat from kangaroo and wombats, he uses by-product from agricultural endeavours like fruit juice and hemp crops. The specialty craft uses traditional techniques, reflecting the history of Burnie's paper industry.

Wild at Heart
Cattlemen and women in the Top End are dusting off the bullcatchers and heading off into the scrub to catch buffalo. Until recently, the wild buffalo haven't been worth the cost and effort to muster, but high cattle prices mean it's now a cheap protein source - ideal for live export into Asia.

Landline: Bio d Vino/Grains Outlook/Heywire/The Paperman/Wild at Heart

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:56
Bio d Vino Filling cow horns with manure and burying them for six months sounds strange, but for biodynamic farmers, it's the basis of their approach to agriculture. The philosophy has skeptics, but Sean Murphy meets some viticulturalists producing award winning wines by following the mysterious principles. Grains Outlook The outlook for the coming season was on the agenda at the Grains Industry Conference this week. While dry conditions across much of the grain belt could slash the size of the national crop by a third - it's not gloom and doom just yet. Heywire Grenfell in Western NSW is the birthplace of Henry Lawson and home to the Happy Inn Chinese restaurant. The Paperman An artisan in north-west Tasmania is making paper from poo. As well as scat from kangaroo and wombats, he uses by-product from agricultural endeavours like fruit juice and hemp crops. The specialty craft uses traditional techniques, reflecting the history of Burnie's paper industry. Wild at Heart Cattlemen and women in the Top End are dusting off the bullcatchers and heading off into the scrub to catch buffalo. Until recently, the wild buffalo haven't been worth the cost and effort to muster, but high cattle prices mean it's now a cheap protein source - ideal for live export into Asia.
The Hard Yards
Every livestock farm needs a good set of yards, and every farmer needs a handy yard dog. These dogs are the best of the best. And the Australian Yard Dog Championships is the ultimate test of canine and human teamwork.

Heywire
Breanna Cook grew up living on a 2000-acre beef cattle property in central Queensland. When she finished school, Breanna had a big decision to make - head to the city for uni or stay on the property and follow her dreams. If you know a young person with a story to tell, encourage them to enter the Heywire competition. Find out more and see other great stories at abc.net.au/heywire.

Coming Home
Country-rockers the Wolfe Brothers are fourth-generation berry growers who left the family farm to pursue their love of music. But when illness brought them home they were faced with some tough challenges. While they are determined to keep their family's 100 year farming legacy alive, they are not putting the guitars away just yet.

Care Farming
A special "care farm" in South Australia provides social care for participants in a meaningful work setting. They are growing snails which are destined for Adelaide's gourmet food market, and their escargot pate could help fund the enterprise into the future.

Landline: The Hard Yards/Heywire/Coming Home/Care Farming

Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 Business and economics, Earth and environment, Sustainability, News and current affairs
57:58
The Hard Yards Every livestock farm needs a good set of yards, and every farmer needs a handy yard dog. These dogs are the best of the best. And the Australian Yard Dog Championships is the ultimate test of canine and human teamwork. Heywire Breanna Cook grew up living on a 2000-acre beef cattle property in central Queensland. When she finished school, Breanna had a big decision to make - head to the city for uni or stay on the property and follow her dreams. If you know a young person with a story to tell, encourage them to enter the Heywire competition. Find out more and see other great stories at abc.net.au/heywire. Coming Home Country-rockers the Wolfe Brothers are fourth-generation berry growers who left the family farm to pursue their love of music. But when illness brought them home they were faced with some tough challenges. While they are determined to keep their family's 100 year farming legacy alive, they are not putting the guitars away just yet. Care Farming A special "care farm" in South Australia provides social care for participants in a meaningful work setting. They are growing snails which are destined for Adelaide's gourmet food market, and their escargot pate could help fund the enterprise into the future.
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