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45:38 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

July 19, 2020  |  Nine

Enemy of the State When 21-year-old student Drew Pavlou organised his first-ever protest at his university campus in Brisbane, little could he have imagined the extraordinary chain of events he would set off. His criticism of China's record on human rights saw him bashed by pro-Beijing protestors and branded an enemy of the Chinese state. What's worse, he and his family were deluged with death threats in a disturbing campaign of intimidation designed to shut him up. You'd think the University of Queensland would race to the defence of its student, but it appears instead to have gone on the attack. The accusation that it has sided with the communist regime raises serious questions about its reliance on Chinese money and how deep Beijing's influence on campus goes. Fire and Ice Making fire from ice may sound like the impossible. But that's exactly what scientists have been able to do in the wilderness of the Arctic as a sleeping giant begins to stir. Ground that's been frozen for thousands of years is rapidly thawing out, releasing dangerous gases on a colossal scale. The result is not only wreaking chaos on local communities but has the potential to rapidly accelerate global warming. Just before the planes stopped flying, Sarah Abo travelled to spectacular Alaska to investigate this worrying new environmental threat that has profound implications for us all.

47:44 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

July 12, 2020  |  Nine

Super Splurge As important as everyone knows superannuation is, the mere mention of the word, particularly among younger generations, used to be a sure-fire guarantee of glazed eyes and stifled yawns. But workers around the country woke up when the financial hit of coronavirus COVID-19 led the government to announce retirement savings of tomorrow could be used to pay the bills of today. More than 2 million Australians have so far found salvation in their super by cashing in as much as $20,000 each. Of course, the money is desperately needed by many, but for others it seems to be an excuse to splurge. And as desirable as designer handbags, new cars and new boobs might be right now, are they really worth more than a comfortable old age? RIP Hong Kong Rest in peace Hong Kong. It might seem over the top to say it, but according to thousands of worried residents, the once thriving hub of Asia is now all but dead. They blame the heavy-handed tactics of the Chinese Communist Party for their city's demise. The Beijing regime has imposed a strict national security law which not only strips Hong Kong of its autonomy but also severely restricts democratic freedoms. Anyone breaking the law faces life imprisonment. The draconian takeover has been condemned around the world with countries including Australia warning its citizens to stay away from the troubled region. However, as Liam Bartlett reports, that's only strengthening the resolve of the increasingly belligerent Chinese leadership. Wrongs and Rights For victims of sexual assault, recovery is often long and torturous. But some women face even more trauma when they find out they are pregnant to their attacker. Every year in the US about 10,000 babies are born as a result of rape. In these situations, the natural assumption is that all compassion, as well as all legal rights, rest with the victim and her child. But as Liam Bartlett discovers, that's not the case in several states where outdated laws mean an increasing number of American rapists are legally applying for, and being granted, custody rights over these children. Thankfully though, there are courageous women fighting to change these crazy laws.

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