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54:25 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

March 15, 2020  |  Nine

Coronavirus: World of Pain (Update) As the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic escalates in Australia and around the world, Sarah Abo reports on the latest medical and economic impacts of the crisis. What Would You Do? It's not something anyone wants to think about even though we all should. What would you do if someone broke into your home in the middle of the night? How would you protect your family and property? When a burglar, armed and high on drugs, crept into his baby's bedroom, Ben Batterham saw red and gave chase. He pursued the intruder out of his house and down the street. There was a violent struggle as Ben attempted a citizen's arrest. Moments later the burglar suffered a heart attack and died. Ben Batterham found himself arrested and charged with murder - so who's the victim and who's the criminal now? Dirty Dealing The figures are staggering. According to the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, last year Australians spent eight and a half billion dollars buying more than 11 tonnes of methamphetamine. Ice, as it's more commonly known, is a dangerous and deadly blight on our country, but it's a hell of a high for the manufacturers and traffickers who profit from it. And contrary to popular opinion that most of the ice is cooked up in grimy backyard labs in suburban Australia, two-thirds of the meth consumed here comes from one small area of the notorious golden triangle of Asia. On assignment for 60 Minutes, Chris Uhlmann has spent months tracking the ice supply chain and the crooks who've become billionaires plying this evil trade.

46:20 | News and current affairs
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60 Minutes

March 8, 2020  |  Nine

World of Pain The predictions about the coronavirus catastrophe grow more ominous by the day, and despite the best efforts of countries like Australia in enacting emergency action plans to contain the disease, its spread continues at a worrying rate. Even the World Health Organization forecasts a world of pain. It says the virus poses a greater global threat than terrorism. That's bad enough, but medical experts tell 60 Minutes it's actually even more terrifying. Professor Gabriel Leung, who led the fight against the SARS virus, believes 60 percent of the world's population could become infected with COVID-19 and that up to 45 million people might die from it. For this story, Liam Bartlett has travelled to Hong Kong and Thailand to find out the likely cause of the disease, as well as the latest ongoing efforts to combat it. At all times he and his crew have followed medical advice and undertaken strict protocols to limit their exposure to potential danger. Dolly's Secret Everyone knows the entertainment business is fickle; success is rare and when it does come, often fleeting. But while flimsy careers in showbiz are a grim reality, the incredible exception to the rule is Dolly Parton. She's been working "'9 to 5" for 53 years, and with album sales in excess of 160 million, has become the greatest country artist of all time. It has also helped her to build an empire worth more than half a billion dollars. Dolly's secret is her ability to appeal to new generations of music fans, who celebrate her unique sound and style. And while she's happy to admit she puts a lot of energy into keeping up appearances, Tom Steinfort found out in Nashville, Tennessee that her down-to-earth persona is as effortless as it is enchanting. Home of Horror It was one of the most disturbing investigations 60 Minutes has ever undertaken, centring on horrific allegations of historic physical and sexual abuse of young boys at a government-run home on the outskirts of Sydney. In the two years since the story was broadcast, seven ex-workers at the institution have been charged and are now being held to account for their alleged criminal cruelty. Last week there was an even more significant development when an eighth man, the former superintendent of the home, was also charged by New South Wales police. That's because this man, shockingly, went on to become a federal member of parliament.

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