News and Current Affairs

F for Fail
To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”.
Wings over the world
To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.

60 Minutes: F for Fail/Wings over the world

News and current affairs

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs
38:43
F for Fail To the outside world they are highly respected, prestigious institutions committed to supporting young Australians as they embark on their journey through tertiary education. But behind the closed doors of many university residential colleges lurks a very different story. In March, Allison Langdon exposed disgusting initiation rituals, out-of-control drunken behaviour and most disturbingly, sexual assaults at colleges around the country. Following the broadcast of our story, “D for Disgrace” 60 Minutes was contacted by many more college residents, sick of the toxic culture which they say is fostered by a hierarchy of people who should know better. Now many students want change and they’re determined to fight for it. Their stories sent to 60 Minutes, along with supporting video and photographic evidence, will shock Australia. As one former college resident warns parents, “Do not send your children to college, because you have no control over what happens, and the atmosphere of secrecy stops you having any knowledge of what your child is going through.” Another tells Allison Langdon that when she raised an allegation of sexual assault with the management of her residential college she was told it was “all part of growing up”. Wings over the world To get the most out of their lives together, Glenn Singleman and Heather Swan go to extraordinary lengths. Or heights, to be more precise. Then, dressed in wingsuits, the couple jump out of planes and fly. They’ve soared over some amazing locations around the world and set multiple adventure records doing it. But there’s one place no one has ever flown in a wingsuit: Antarctica. So when Glenn and Heather told Liz Hayes of their dream to fly over the frozen continent, she thought it was mission impossible.
Trusting financial advisers
Former Macquarie Bank clients, Greg and Julie Lewis, say they lost their farm and most of their super after following financial advice which saw their money churned through risky trades. Read the full response from Macquarie Bank here.

Queen uses her handbag to send her staff signals
When Australia's new High Commissioner to Britain, George Brandis, met the Queen, all eyes seemed to be on the Queen's handbag. It's a little known fact that the Queen uses her bag to signal for help in social situations, a fact Annabel Crabb learned when she studied Royal tradition before anchoring the ABC's recent coverage of Prince Harry's wedding to Meghan Markle.

Victoria Police officers fake roadside breath tests
An internal audit has revealed that Victoria Police officers faked more than 250,000 roadside breath tests. The phony tests were an apparent attempt by officers to meet quotas. The police are already paying the price, with the state's Transport Accident Commission suspending $4 million in road safety funding.

Russian journalist's murder staged
A day after Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko was supposedly murdered, he turned up alive at news conference and revealed his murder had been staged to avoid a Russian assassination attempt. France 24 journalist Gulliver Cragg was in Kiev for the press conference and joined 7.30 to discuss what happened.

CJ Hendry turns passion into a career
You'll often hear that the key to success is finding your passion and making a career out of it. That is exactly what Brisbane artist CJ Hendry has done. She went from failed careers in accountancy and architecture to counting Kanye West and Gwyneth Paltrow among her fans.

7.30: Trusting financial advisers/Victoria Police officers fake roadside breath tests/Russian journalist's murder staged/CJ Hendry turns passion into a career

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:49
Trusting financial advisers Former Macquarie Bank clients, Greg and Julie Lewis, say they lost their farm and most of their super after following financial advice which saw their money churned through risky trades. Read the full response from Macquarie Bank here. Queen uses her handbag to send her staff signals When Australia's new High Commissioner to Britain, George Brandis, met the Queen, all eyes seemed to be on the Queen's handbag. It's a little known fact that the Queen uses her bag to signal for help in social situations, a fact Annabel Crabb learned when she studied Royal tradition before anchoring the ABC's recent coverage of Prince Harry's wedding to Meghan Markle. Victoria Police officers fake roadside breath tests An internal audit has revealed that Victoria Police officers faked more than 250,000 roadside breath tests. The phony tests were an apparent attempt by officers to meet quotas. The police are already paying the price, with the state's Transport Accident Commission suspending $4 million in road safety funding. Russian journalist's murder staged A day after Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko was supposedly murdered, he turned up alive at news conference and revealed his murder had been staged to avoid a Russian assassination attempt. France 24 journalist Gulliver Cragg was in Kiev for the press conference and joined 7.30 to discuss what happened. CJ Hendry turns passion into a career You'll often hear that the key to success is finding your passion and making a career out of it. That is exactly what Brisbane artist CJ Hendry has done. She went from failed careers in accountancy and architecture to counting Kanye West and Gwyneth Paltrow among her fans.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area.
After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.”

But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply.
“I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.”
That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area.
Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property.
Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land.
They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure.
“I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.”
Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project.
But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department.
With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.

Insight: Gassy Coonamble

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
52:36
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what happens when coal seam gas comes to town. Steven Jones, a Narrabri local of 35 years, lives on 800 acres near the NSW Pilliga Forest. Part of his property falls within the boundaries of a proposed coal seam gas drilling area. After living next door to exploration gas wells, he says he would be happy to have the wells on his property and doesn’t have any concerns with this type of resource being developed in the region. “As long as the government keeps an eye on it to make sure they don’t do wrong…I’m 100 per cent for them.” But some Narrabri locals are less certain. Jon-Maree wouldn’t be happy to have the wells on her land out of concern about the potential environmental effects, in particular the risk to the region’s water supply. “I think it's really important to understand that a rural property, without water, is nothing. Without water our communities don't function.” That’s a concern shared by many vocal opponents from Coonamble, a small rural town, almost 200km from the proposed project area. Adam and Rowena Macrae are farmers who have poured money into their almost 4,000 acre property. Part of a 461km pipeline, that will transport the gas from the project to the NSW market, is slated to be built under their land. They feel there is too much uncertainty around the project and its associated infrastructure. “I think that the risks are too high and we're not prepared to take those risks with our family.” Gas company Santos has overseen exploration in the area in recent years and says these wells could provide up to 50 per cent of NSW’s gas needs. Last year, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull urged the NSW Government to approve the Narrabri Gas Project. But local opinion about the project is divided. More than 23,000 submissions were received by the NSW Department of Planning, making it the most protested project in the history of the department. With a looming domestic gas shortage on the horizon and the region awaiting to hear whether the project gets given the green light by the NSW Government, a special edition of Insight travels to Narrabri to hear from those who may be affected by the project and its infrastructure.
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