Current Affairs

Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it.
At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League.
So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly.
But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain.
At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition.
Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity.
Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms.
There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.

Insight: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
51:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at chronic fatigue syndrome, what symptoms it has, and how people with the condition have managed it. At 20 years old, Adele Clydesdale had just climbed Mount Kilimanjaro; she was starting her second year of university and playing in the Victorian Netball League. So when she got glandular fever, she didn’t think much of it. She knew plenty of people who’d had it in high school and they always recovered quickly. But even when tests results revealed the glandular fever was out of her system, Adele was still unwell and her symptoms were getting worse. She was increasingly fatigued, couldn’t string sentences together and had extreme body pain. At six months, it was confirmed Adele had chronic fatigue syndrome, a diagnosis she found quite confronting. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect between 0.2-2 per cent of the population in Australia yet very little is known about this condition. Otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis or ME, it is an illness characterised by profound fatigue, not relieved by sleep or rest and worsened with activity. Patients will commonly experience muscle and joint pain, impaired memory and concentration and gastrointestinal disorders. However, the most defining indicator of CFS is Post Exertional Malaise (PEM) - when a certain level of cognitive or physical exertion will exacerbate a patient’s symptoms. There are currently no proven treatments for CFS which means many are left without answers. Ketra Wooding has been unwell for eight years and with such severe symptoms, she has been living in a nursing home for five of those years.
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump
Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward.
Young women and injuries
The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world.
Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power
More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks.
Asian elephants under threat 
The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.

7.30: October 15, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
29:08
The man who broke Watergate talks about Donald Trump Donald Trump may have popularised the term 'fake news', but the wild nature of his presidency has also spawned an extraordinary series of insider accounts of his chaotic White House. The latest and most substantial of these is 'Fear' by veteran Washington reporter Bob Woodward. Young women and injuries The introduction of an AFL women's competition, the rise of the Matildas, and the increasing popularity of women's cricket all reflect a huge increase in the popularity of women's team sport. But with this surge has come a significant increase in serious knee injuries. Women are up to ten times more likely to rupture their anterior cruciate ligament than men, and Australia has the highest rate of knee reconstructions in the world. Energy distributors push for a cap on solar power More than six solar panels are installed across Australia every minute of every day as people try to tackle rising power prices. But the industry that owns Australia's poles and wires says all that power from the sun is a problem and it could destabilise the electricity grid. The solar industry disagrees, and it's preparing for a fight with the power networks. Asian elephants under threat The Asian elephant is one of the world's most majestic animals. But now these gentle giants face a threat that could wipe them out completely … poachers who want their skin.
Religious Freedom
The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments.
South China Sea
Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea.
Tensions rise between China and the US
Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections.
Deadly dust
Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency.
Richard Branson's personal appeal 
The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.

7.30: October 10, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
31:07
Religious Freedom The warring forces within the federal Coalition have been notably silent in recent weeks, with all sides only too aware that such divisions could torpedo the chances their chances in the Wentworth by-election. But that peace was shattered today by the leaking of some details of a tightly-held report on proposed changes to religious freedom laws. The Australian Financial Review's political editor Phil Coorey discusses the latest developments. South China Sea Former US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, takes a look at what is happening in the South China Sea. Tensions rise between China and the US Tensions are rising between the world's two biggest economies. The tough talks follows last week's incident in the South China Sea, where warships from the United States and China came within 45 metres of colliding. The US is already locked in a trade war with Beijing and the US President has accused China of meddling in its upcoming elections. Deadly dust Silicosis is a potentially deadly lung disease mostly associated with the coal mining industry. But there has been a silicosis outbreak in Queensland among tradesmen who make kitchen and bathroom bench tops with engineered stone. Some of those workers and the medical profession are sounding the alarm about what they fear could become a public health emergency. Richard Branson's personal appeal The executions of convicted drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in Indonesia in 2015 shocked Australia. But they also attracted global interest - including from some unlikely places. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson is a passionate campaigner against the death penalty and made a personal appeal to Indonesia's president at the time to spare the couple.
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what it's like to date when you're over 60.
Corporate speaker and theatre critic, Ron Lee, is in his sixties and busy dating six different women several nights a week.
Recently retired scientist, Mariane Merati, 61, loves romance and has found she’s in hot demand with younger men on dating app Tinder. She likes to explore the world by dating men of different cultures.
And 74-year-old widow, Beverley Rilatt-Richardson, entered the dating scene in her seventies and was surprised to discover she still had ‘pulling power’. She reawakened herself sexually and was thrilled to fall in lust at 73.
The stereotypes of older people being ‘past it’ or no longer interested in dating or sex are smashed in this episode of Insight called Dating After 60. In fact, according to online dating website, RSVP, older adults are the fastest growing demographic on online dating websites. RSVPs over sixties members are on the increase and now account for 14.5 per cent of all members, up from 11.4 per cent just a year ago. With more and more single people over 60 looking for love, there’s been a rapid proliferation of dating sites popping up especially for the baby boomer market.
Seventy-nine year old Jim Peters hasn’t been on the dating scene since he was 20. He was married for 50 years and when his wife died five years ago he thought he’d stay single forever. But a few years later their dogs died, the house was quiet and he discovered that the life of a grey nomad wasn’t for him so he bravely put himself out there on an online dating site. He’s looking for a well-travelled, intelligent lady between the age of 65 and 75. He says he's not dead yet so why not get out there and live a bit!
This humorous and surprising episode examines what it’s like to look for love and companionship after the age of 60.

Insight: Dating After 60

News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding

Years 9-10, 11-12 News and current affairs, Intercultural understanding
53:56
Jenny Brockie takes a look at what it's like to date when you're over 60. Corporate speaker and theatre critic, Ron Lee, is in his sixties and busy dating six different women several nights a week. Recently retired scientist, Mariane Merati, 61, loves romance and has found she’s in hot demand with younger men on dating app Tinder. She likes to explore the world by dating men of different cultures. And 74-year-old widow, Beverley Rilatt-Richardson, entered the dating scene in her seventies and was surprised to discover she still had ‘pulling power’. She reawakened herself sexually and was thrilled to fall in lust at 73. The stereotypes of older people being ‘past it’ or no longer interested in dating or sex are smashed in this episode of Insight called Dating After 60. In fact, according to online dating website, RSVP, older adults are the fastest growing demographic on online dating websites. RSVPs over sixties members are on the increase and now account for 14.5 per cent of all members, up from 11.4 per cent just a year ago. With more and more single people over 60 looking for love, there’s been a rapid proliferation of dating sites popping up especially for the baby boomer market. Seventy-nine year old Jim Peters hasn’t been on the dating scene since he was 20. He was married for 50 years and when his wife died five years ago he thought he’d stay single forever. But a few years later their dogs died, the house was quiet and he discovered that the life of a grey nomad wasn’t for him so he bravely put himself out there on an online dating site. He’s looking for a well-travelled, intelligent lady between the age of 65 and 75. He says he's not dead yet so why not get out there and live a bit! This humorous and surprising episode examines what it’s like to look for love and companionship after the age of 60.
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard?
The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'.
Bill Hare discusses climate change report
The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means.
Alison Harcourt
Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students.
Cable Beach
It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.

7.30: October 8, 2018

News and current affairs

Years 11-12 News and current affairs
28:35
The Opera House: world heritage listed cultural precinct or Sydney's biggest billboard? The decision to allow a horse race to be promoted on the Opera House sails has sparked outrage and questions reportedly being asked at UNESCO. But it's not just the Prime Minister who's defended the move. The NSW Premier and Racing NSW say the promotion is in line with previous sporting and cultural use building's sails. Former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, Michael Lynch says the horse racing promotion proposed for the sails of the Opera House is 'highly inappropriate'. Bill Hare discusses climate change report The UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change released a report today which paints an alarming picture of the impact of a 2 per cent increase in global temperatures as a result of climate change. It says urgent and unprecedented action is needed to keep the increase to one and a half degrees. Dr Bill Hare of the CEO of Climate Analytics discusses what it means. Alison Harcourt Alison Harcourt may not be a household name, but the 88-year-old statistics pioneer is somewhat of a celebrity in some parts of the maths world. Her work has helped measure poverty in Australia and played a key role in amending the Electoral Act, and the octogenarian is still going strong and tutoring the next generation of young students. Cable Beach It's one of the most popular images in Australian tourism, camel trains silhouetted against a setting sun on Broome's Cable Beach. But there's trouble brewing in the remote paradise, as the camels share the beach with growing numbers of tourists and four wheel drive vehicles.
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