23:56 | Published 2 years ago
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Spaced Out Science!

3…2…1…BLAST OFF! Join Lee on this brand new episode of Scope as we head off to explore some science that is out of this world! We learn all about the biological problems involved with long-term space travel, we make our very own nebulas and we see how the planets in our solar system measure up! Model Solar System Our solar system is a lot bigger than you might think! To demonstrate the astronomically large distances between the planets in our solar system, Samuel Hinton and Dr Janie Hoormann from the University of Queensland have set up their very own model solar system spanning an entire university campus! Space Medicine The human body goes through immense changes once it leaves earth’s gravitational field! Dr Marc Jurblum from St Vincent’s Hospital walks us through the biological challenges associated with long-term space travel! DIY – Nebula Saduni and Emma from Endeavour College learn all about the astronomical phenomena of nebulas my making their very own model in a jar! Mars Mapping How do you take a photo of something 54.6 million kilometres away? Well, as Dr Eriita Jones from the University of South Australia explains, all it takes are some satellites, a lot of time and a little astronomical know how. Satellite Systems Satellites are an integral part of our modern world. Join Dr Matt Tetlow from the University of Adelaide as he explains how do these modern mechanical marvels work and how we get them into space! All that and more on an astronomical episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

22:29 | Published 2 years ago
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Earth Science 2017

There's no place quite like it! On this episode of SCOPE, we take an in-depth look at the planet we call home; Earth! We learn about our planet's history with some inquisitive geology, we get a crash course in meteorology and we solve mysteries with forensic soil analysis. Geology When you go for a walk you may think 'Oh there just rocks'. But are they? Rocks may not seem like the most interesting subjects to study, but as Catherine Wheller from Melbourne University explains, the stuff under our feet can tell us a lot about how our planet has changed over billions of years. Volcanos 101 Lee heads over to the University of Queensland to catch up with Volcanologist Isabelle Jones and get the low-down on these fiery geological phenomena. Meteorology Weather affects every aspect of our lives; from what we wear, to where we go, to what we eat! Join Andrea Peace from the Bureau of Meteorology as she gives us a crash course in weather 101! DIY Science - Anemometer How do you measure wind speed? With an anemometer of course! Join junior scientist Charlotte as she makes her very own, with some paper cups, clay, and a little scientific know-how! Seismograph Earthquakes can be some of the most destructive and unpredictable events in nature! So how do we record such erratic phenomena? With a seismograph of course! We catch up with Adam Pascale from the Seismology Research Centre as he explains how these amazing machines work! Forensic Soil When it comes to a crime scene, sometimes the tiniest piece of evidence, like soil from a shoe, can crack the case! Join forensic soil analyst Prof Rob Fitzpatrick from the CSIRO as he explains how by studying soil, he can get the dirt on who, what and has been at a crime scene. All that and more on a very down to earth episode of SCOPE!

Science

23:58 | Published 2 years ago
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Medi Science

Join Lee on SCOPE as she dives head first into the world of medical science! We learn all about the relationship between nature and medicine, we head out to a blood donation centre and we find out exactly how an x-ray operates! Nature and Medicine Nature and medicine have been working side by side for centuries! Catch up with Dr Sean Coakley from the University of Queensland as he walks you through some of their greatest collaborations and hints at what's still to come! Blood Donation Join Lee as she steps out of the bunker and into to the Red Cross blood donation centre, where Kasey Buchan is on hand to help her out with her donation! How an X-Ray Works You may have had an X-ray yourself or know someone who has! But how exactly do they work? Well, that's the very question Hannah Milnes from the Wesley Medical Imaging Centre is here to answer! DIY - Breathing Machines We breathe in and out every day without really thinking about it, but what's actually happening when we do this? Junior scientists Claire and Alice find out by building a model of the human respiratory system. Kangaroo Cartilage It may sound strange, but as Tomina Ali from Queensland University of Technology explains, kangaroos could be the key to helping repair damaged cartilage in human knees joints. Motion Capture CP Cerebral Palsy is disease that seriously affects how a person is able to move. That's why Jarred Gillette from the University of Queensland is working to find new ways to improve muscle function for Cerebral Palsy sufferers. All that and more on a medically sound episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

24:01 | Published 2 years ago
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Innovative Science

Innovation is the force that drives science forward and on this episode of SCOPE we explore some of the most innovative science in the world today! We check out a harp with no strings, we tick along with the world's most accurate clock and we trek through the Peruvian jungle from the comfort of a VR lab! Laser Harp The harp has been around for more than 5000 years old. Junior Inventor Reuben from Brighton Grammar School thought it was about time to bring this ancient instrument into the 21st Century using laser. Touch DNA Device DNA testing is essential to any crime scene investigation. But traditional collection methods can be inefficient. Luckily, Associate Professor Sandy Walkers' has a revolutionary new forensic tool that could soon change all that. Thermoelectric Battery Junior inventor Jaikob Akinci from Brighton Grammar School showcases his unique way of generating electricity from the heat of a candle! Sapphire Clock Losing a couple of seconds off your wristwatch every month may not be a big deal to you, but when it comes to scientific measurements keeping time is essential to accurate record keeping. That's why Andre Luiten and Martin O'Connor from the University of Adelaide have developed a clock so accurate it only loses a single second every 30 million years! DIY Science - Solar Oven Ovens, microwaves and ... pizza boxes? Junior scientist Hayley Sisson explains how you can use the power of the sun to cook up some of your favourite treats! VR Conservation Join Professor Kerrie Mengersen from Queensland University of Technology as she's takes some of the world's leading conservation scientists out of the lab and into the Amazon with the help of virtual reality! All that and more on a truly innovative episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

24:00 | Published 2 years ago
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Animals And Health

On this episode of Scope animals and health collide! We give a Sumatran tiger a health check, we solve a marine mammal mystery and we take to the skies to outsmart some meddlesome mosquitos! Bio Bank Most zoos vary the temperatures of each exhibit depending on which animal it holds. But all the animals in this 'frozen zoo' are kept at a chilly -185 degrees! As Claire Keely from Melbourne Museum explains, these 44, 000 frozen wildlife tissue samples are being used to help protect Australia's most endangered species. Operation Big Cat There's a big operation happening at Melbourne Zoo; Binjai the Sumatran tiger is undergoing a full medical health check! Join veterinarian Dr Sarah Frith as she explains how they gave this 140kg cat a check-up! Whale Fossil Dr David Hocking from Museum Victoria explains how one whale fossil helped solve a massive marine mammal mystery! DIY - Dog Treats Dogs can get bored when left home alone, so just how do you keep your canine companion entertained while your away? Well, Junior Scientist Amy might have the answer for you. Mozzie Drone Mosquitos aren't just annoying; they can also spread fatal diseases! Join Tasya Saira from the University of Adelaide as she takes to the skies with some incredible infrared technology to locate mosquito breeding grounds! Fish Quarantine Aquariums are great ways to learn about our diverse marine ecosystems. But before they can go on display, these aquatic creatures need to get through Bradley Dohnt from Sea Life Melbourne Aquarium and his quarantine health checks! All that and more on a jam-packed episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes the extraordinary!

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23:58 | Published 2 years ago
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The World Of Tech

Technology is all around us and it's changing at an ever increasing speed. Luckily Lee has a brand new episode of SCOPE to keep you up to date with all these amazing technological advantages! We dive beneath the waves with some marine archaeology, we strap on our virtual reality headset for a cycle and we meet weaver the 6 legged robot! 3D Marine Archaeology Most archaeological digs happen above land, but not the ones John McCarthy from Flinders University is involved with! Join John as he shows off some of the amazing tech he uses to capture and showcase his deep sea discoveries! Diving Tech Practice doesn't make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect! Luckily, Raymond Cohen from the CSIRO has developed a computer program that ensures Australia's elite divers are perfectly practicing! VR Cycling Usually, you'd have to train for years as an elite cyclist to zip around the velodrome. Now, thanks to Johnathan Shepard from Griffith University and some impressive technology, anyone can experience this thrill in virtual reality! DIY - Playdough Circuits You're never too old to play with playdough! And as junior scientist Jayden demonstrates, you're never too old to learn about electrical circuits either! Remote Communications Electronic communication is an essential part of everyone's lives. But the further you head out of our cities, the harder that becomes. Join David Haley and Tom Rayner from Myriota as they explain how their simple piece of technology could solve this problem forever! Weaver Robot What has no pulse, 6 limbs and can travers almost any terrain? Weaver 6-legged the robot of course! Join his creator Dr Navinda Kottege as he explains what makes this robotic hexapod so special! All that and more on a technological episode of SCOPE!

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23:58 | Published 2 years ago
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Science and Nature

Join Lee for a band new episode of SCOPE all about the natural world! We delve into the science of bio-security with a fungus-fighting drone, we learn all about the Amazonian Waterlily and we have a bone to pick with some dermestid beetles! Myrtle Rust What do fungus, artificial intelligence and flying robots have in common? Well, along with Dr Grant Hamilton from Queensland University of Technology, they're all involved in fighting the ferocious fungus attacking out native flora and fauna; myrtle rust! Budgie Avoidance Automated drones are set to change the world, but how can we get them to avoid mid-air collisions? Well, as Hong Vo and Debajoyoti Karmaker from the university of Queensland explain; the answer might lie in the humble budgie. Fruit Fly Trap Fruit flies cost farmers billions of dollars every year! Luckily, Professor Dick Drew from Griffith University, has a plan to stop these destructive pests in their tracks! DIY Science - Crystalized Beach Rock Diamonds, gems, sugar, salt; crystals come in all shapes and sizes in the natural world! Junior scientist Chelsea is using borax to make some crystals of her very own! Waterlily Pavilion Join John Sandham, from the Botanic Gardens of South Australia, inside one of the most advanced greenhouses in the world! Dermestid Beetles Tamara Morgan from Melbourne Museum explains how the flesh eating Dermestid Beetle is one of the most helpful creatures in the animal kingdom! All that and more on an all-natural episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

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24:00 | Published 2 years ago
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Scoping Out Science

Join Lee for a brand new episode of Scope as she checks out some amazing science. We find out about the gidgee skink and why they live in family groups, we meet a scientist who found inspiration for a new fingerprinting technique after his house was broken in to, and we check out the sounds of the ocean. High Pressure Juice Nothing beats chomping into some fresh produce! But getting food that's truly fresh can be tricky. Luckily Sandra Olivier and Kai Knoerzer from the CSIRO have developed a new way to keep your food fresh for longer! Lizard Behaviour Most lizards live solitary lives. But as Associate Professor Mike Gardener explains gidgee skinks prefer the company of others. Glowing Fingerprints Dusting for fingerprints is an essential part to any crime scene investigation. But those fingerprints can sometimes be hard to find. Not to fear; Dr Kang Liang and Dr JJ Richardson have developed a new technique that makes fingerprints glow! DIY - Paper Mache Join junior scientist Michelle as she explores the science behind papier mache while creating her very own pinata. Changing Oceans Oceans aren't as silent as you might think, they're filled with a whole host of marine murmurings! But that might soon change. Associate Professor Ivan Nagelkerken and Professor Sean Connell from the University of Adelaide are studying what affect pollution has on these nautical noises. Whale Forensics Whales and dolphins are some of the most interesting creatures on the planet. But when they die, they often wash up along our coast. And when that happens, Catherine Kemper from the South Australian Museum gets the call! All that and more in another science-rific episode of SCOPE where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

24:00 | Published 2 years ago
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Medical Wonders

Join Lee for a brand new episode of SCOPE as we venture into the world of Medical Wonders! We find out what happens when biology and virtual reality collide, we learn how antibiotics are made and we explore how venom can be used in medicine! Malaria Breakthrough Mosquitos aren't just annoying; in some parts of the world they can also spread an infectious disease called Malaria. And that's something that Dr Michelle Wykes and her team from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute are trying to put a stop to! Skin Science It's the human body's largest organ, it's totally waterproof and it keeps your insides in. Yep, our skin is pretty amazing! Dr Amy Holmes from the University of South Australia is studying how this brilliant biological barrier is able to keep out unwanted chemicals! Medical VR Cancer cells are really small; like microscopically small! So how do you get a good look inside one? Virtually of course. Professor Rob Parton from the University of Queensland explains how he's able to explore these medical wonders in 3D virtual reality. DIY Science - Articulated Hand Join junior scientists Alice and Claire as they explore the inner workings of the human hand by creating their very own articulated model! Making Antibiotics Join molecular biologist Dr Angie Jarrad from the University of Queensland as she hunts for an antibiotic superhero to fight a new generation of superbugs! Venom Bank Imagine if the deadliest venoms in the world could be used to cure some of the most fatal diseases! Well, thanks to Dr Maria Ikonomopoulou from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute that could soon become a reality! All that and more on a medically marvellous episode of SCOPE, where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

23:58 | Published 2 years ago
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The Science Of Getting Around

Join Lee as she gets from A to B in an episode all about the science of getting around! We meet Dylan and his award winning drone, we learn how trams are built and we find out where dingos go when we're not looking! Dylan's Drone Design Join Dylan as he walks you through his award winning drone design. Tram Making With over 500 km of track and more than 400 trams, Melbourne's tram network is one of the largest in the world! But, as Leigh Camilleri and Laurent Herisson from Bombardier Transport explain, it all starts in the factory where they're built! DIY Frisbee Aerodynamics Frisbees are amazingly fun to toss around! But as junior scientist Harry explains the aerodynamics that help it fly, can be just as interesting! Roller Research To build anything you need a strong foundation, and in order to build a strong foundation you need a rolling dynamic compactor. Professor Mark Jaksa from the University of Adelaide has been experimenting with these complex contraptions to figure out how to best use this vital tool. Dingo Tracking Dingos are one of Australia's most iconic native species, but what they get up to when we're not around still remains a mystery. That is until now! Jack Tatler from the University of Adelaide has been using specialised collars to learn all about the secret lives of dingos! All that and more on a very out and about episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

Science

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