23:56 | Science
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Science In The Air  |  ELEVEN

It’s odourless, colourless and it’s all around us! Join Lee on a brand new episode of SCOPE, as she explores the science that’s in the air. We head out to Australia’s second largest wind farm, we ascend to the clouds in a police helicopter and we use Bernoulli's principle to levitate a ping pong ball! Wind Farm: There are many ways to generate electricity, but one of the cleanest and coolest is by wind! We catch up with Todd Mead from Trustpower as he walks us through the second largest wind farm in Australia! Greenhouse Gas Monitoring: Agriculture emits more carbon dioxide than any other Australian industry! But how can we monitor its impact? Max de Antoni Migliorati from Queensland University of Technology has developed a clever device to do just that! Police Air Wing: Whether it’s for crime prevention or for search and rescue missions, an eye in the sky is a valuable tool for any police department. Join Leading Senior Constable Steve Hargrave from Victoria Police, as he shows off some of the latest technology on board the Police Air Wing helicopter! DIY Science – Ping Pong Levitator: Levitation may sound impossible, but as junior scientist Jayden show us that with a ping pong ball, a hair dryer and a little science know-how, you too can defy gravity! Glossy Cockatoo Research: The glossy black-cockatoo used to populate Australia’s southern states but now they can only be found on South Australia’s Kangaroo Island. But thanks to Michael Barth from the Department of Environment Water Natural Resources, this endangered species could be making a comeback! Airborne Research: 3D maps play a huge role in research projects around the world. But how are they made? We ascend into the clouds with Andrew McGrath from Airborne Research to create one of these maps using some amazing scanning technology! So join Lee, up in the air, as the ordinary becomes extraordinary under the SCOPE!

23:56 | Science
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Hydro Habitats  |  Eleven

Hydro Habitats: Some animals live in trees, others on land but a vast majority of them live in the stuff that covers 70% of our planet's surface. That's right, on this episode of SCOPE we explore the aquatic world of hydro habitats! We head out to Victoria's largest national marine park, we catch up with some dolphins and we learn all about the bizarre breeding habits of coral! Wilson's Prom: Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park is the largest in Victoria and as Dr Steffan Howe and Dan Ierodiaconou from Parks Victoria and Deakin University explain, the remarkable reefs and colourful coral here rival that of the Great Barrier Reef! Dolphin Sanctuary: Pollution can have a devastating effect on our marine ecosystem. But as Marianna Boorman from the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary Action Group explains, these effects can be reversed and marine life can return to a previously inhospitable environment. DIY Science - Water Filter: Clean water isn't hard to come by in a country like Australia, but what if we didn't have access to clean water? Well we'd have to use a filter! Join junior scientist Alexi as he tries out several different water filters to find the most efficient way of making dirty water clean! Coral Spawning: Coral reefs are essential to the health of a marine ecosystems. So understanding how they reproduce is vital! Join Dr Christopher Doropoulos from the CSIRO as he walks us through the bizarre breeding habits of coral! Clownfish Conservation: Meet Anita Nedosyko from Flinders University, she's developed a captive breeding program for Clownfish that is helping conserve their populations in the wild! So join Lee in the lab as the ordinary becomes extraordinary under the SCOPE!

24:00 | Science
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Science of Fire  |  Eleven

SCIENCE OF FIRE: Humans have been fascinated by fire for tens of thousands of years! And on this episode of SCOPE, we stoke the coals of that curiosity with an episode all about this chemical combustion! We learn how fire trucks are made, we use computing power to predict bushfires and we fight fire with chemistry! FIRE TRUCK CONSTRUCTION: A regular old truck won't do the trick - to fight fires, you need some very special equipment! Join Ian Taylor and Mark Wallace from Liquip as they run through how they put together the vehicles that make up Queensland's fire fighting fleet! SPARKS MODELLING: Bush fires are chaotic and unpredictable! That's why Will Swedosh from the CSIRO developed a computer based fire simulator which can predict how a fire will behave before they start to spread! FIRE LAB: Join Dr Cristian Maluk and Dr Angus Law from the University of Queensland as they show off some amazing technology which allows them to study how fire behaves, not just down here on earth, but also up in space! DIY SCIENCE - SILVER EGG: Using fire and an optical illusion Junior Scientist Alexi shows us how to make an egg appear to be silver. FIRE TABLE: Bushfires are a dangerous aspect of the Australian wilderness. But as Nick McCarthy from the University of Queensland and Andrew Sturgess from the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services explain, devices such as their 'fire table' can help predict how these natural phenomenon behave in real life! FIRE FIGHTING SCIENCE: Join Paul Elso and Dawn Hartog from the Country Fire Authority as they explain how they're fighting fire ... with science! So get fired up for another fascinating episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

24:00 | Science
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Flora Fauna and Science  |  Eleven

From monkeys to marigolds, octopi to orchids they all fall under the banner of flora and fauna! Join Lee as she explores the life that populates the world around us. We analyse wombat wee, we track the largest fish in the ocean and find out what goes on behind the scenes in a museum! WOMBAT WEE: Alyce Swinbourne from the University of Queensland is helping wombats to breed in captivity by studying their wee. EUCALYPTUS OIL: Larry Turner from Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Oil's show us how they bottle this unique oil through the scientific process of distillation! WHALE SHARK TRACKING: They've been around since the Jurassic era and are the largest fish in the ocean, but we still don't know much about these gentle giants of the ocean. However, that could soon change thanks to Samantha Reynolds from the University of Queensland and her satellite tracking geo-tags! DIY - SPROUT HOUSE: Join junior scientist Amelia as she explores what seeds need to thrive by building her very own sprout house. INSIDE MUSEUM SCIENCE: Associate Professor Mark Stevens and Dr Kate Sparks from the South Australian Museum show us why preserving flora and fauna in museums is so important. UV FROGS: The world's frog populations are in danger because of a fungal infection. Nic Lundsgaard from the University of Queensland is on the case to find out more about the fungus and how climate change may be contributing. All that and more on a biologically fascinating episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:58 | Science
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Up and Coming Science  |  Eleven

Cutting edge, ground breaking, up and coming, whatever you want to call it, when it comes to the latest and greatest in scientific advancements, this episode of SCOPE has it covered! We check out some blinking bike lights, we meet some dancing robots and we learn all about how we all learn! BIKE BLINKERS: While riding a bike, taking your hands off the handlebar to indicate turning can be dangerous. Luckily for us, junior inventor and BHP Billiton award winner Jory has developed a solution to this common problem. NANOTECHNOLOGY: When we want to learn more about cells we usually peer at them through a microscope. But what if we wanted to look at them while they were still in the body? Join Dr Malcolm Purdey from the University of Adelaide as he explains how nanotechnology could help us tackle this problem head on! DIY SCIENCE - BALLOON REACTIONS: Junior scientists Bella and Jade from Cavendish Road State High School use chemical reactions to find new ways to blow up balloons. MEET MY ROBOT - ACCROBOT: Some robots build, other robots race but these robots dance! Meet Jonathan Roberts and Georgina Hine from Queensland University of Technology as they explain the ins and outs of their performing robots! SCIENTIFIC LEARNING: In most schools, it's the students that learn from the teachers. But for Professor Robyn Gilles from the University of Queensland, she's the one learning from the students! UNBOILING AN EGG: Unboiling an egg might sound impossible, but Professor Colin Raston from Flinders University shows us a machine that can do exactly that. So join Lee as she discovers the latest that science has to offer on SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:56 | Science
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Wearable Science  |  Eleven

On this episode of Scope it's all about the science we wear! We check out a ring that can control your phone, we learn how to grow clothes from kombucha and we find out what it takes to make an aerodynamic bike helmet! SMART RING: Aaron Mohtar from Elppy has developed a device which you can wear as a ring to control all the smart devices in your life. KOMBUCHA CLOTHING: Dr Alice Payne from Queensland University of Technology and Peter Musk from The Edge show us how art and science can collide to grow your own clothes out of kombucha. RUNNING SHOE: Imagine if your shoes could tell you when they needed replacing! Well, that's where Dr Paul Collins and Dr Jason Bonacci from Deakin University are hoping their research on shoe deterioration will lead. DIY - COLOUR CHANGING TEE: Join Junior Scientist Mackenzie as he explores the properties of photochromic paint by making a t-shirt that changes colour in the sun! WETSUIT EXPERIMENTING: Wetsuits are an essential piece of equipment for many water based hobbies and sports! That's why it's so important Dr Anthony Ellis and his junior scientists from BioLab find the most efficient and suitable material for their very own wetsuit! AERODYNAMIC HELMET: When it comes to cycling a fraction of a second can mean the difference between winning and losing. And as Richard and Fergus Kelso from the University of Adelaide explain it could be your helmet that propels you to victory. So join Lee for yet another jam-packed episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:57 | Science
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Ecotech  |  Eleven

On this episode of Scope we find out what happens when the environment and technology collide. Not only can they live in harmony, they can help each other out! We check out the amazing life of coral, we learn how to make crystals from eggs and we explore ecosystems with our ears! LIGHTS, CAMERA AND CORAL: The stars in Brett Lewis' nature documentaries may be slow, but they're still rather spectacular! Join him at Queensland University of Technology as he explain how he's able to capture the movements of these amazing creatures! SMARTER STREET LIGHTS: Imagine if the streets lights were able to see you coming and light the way just for you! Well imagine no more! Priscilla Corbell and Peter Auhl from Adealide City Council introduce us to the new smart street lights gracing our streets! WEED FUEL: Weeds can be pesky backyard intruders! But as Caitlin Byrt from the University of Adelaide explains, they might one day be used to run our cars! DIY - EGG GEODE: Crystals can be found everywhere, from salt to snowflakes to diamonds! Junior Scientist Luci shows us how she makes crystals in egg shells and they are egg-cellent. GREENHOUSE LASER: Our planet relies upon a delicate balance gasses, which makes monitoring these gases very important! Meet Associate Professor David Ottaway and Dr Ori Henderson Sapir from the University of Adelaide who have developed a new laser which can detect greenhouse gasses over long distances. ACOUSTIC MONITORING: Dr David Tucker from Queensland University of Technology lets us in on how he eavesdrops on a forest to find out how natural sounds can speak volumes about an ecosystem's health! So join Lee in the lab for an eco-tech filled episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:58 | Science
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Body Science  |  Eleven

Body of Science Science is all around us and it is even inside of us! On this episode of SCOPE we explore the science that makes us, us. We discover some fascinating facts about the tongue, we learn how an exoskeleton is helping paraplegics walk and we check out some 3D printed heart stents! Exo-Skeleton Tech: Genny Kroll-Rosen and Jim Barrett from Making Strides show us some exciting exoskeleton technology that can help people during rehabilitation or to take steps every day. Body Facts - Tongue: The tongue is one of the most important muscles in the body. It helps us with eating, tasting and even talking! Join Dr Tom Pearson from the University of Queensland as he lays out some fascinating facts about this biologically baffling body part! DIY Science - Stress Test: Junior scientist Harry puts stress to the test using a thermometer, a blood pressure monitor and a challenging general knowledge quiz. 3D Heart Stents: 3D printed technology is everywhere! From engineering to art and now even the heart! Join Professor Peter Barlis from the University of Melbourne as he explains how this amazing technology is reshaping cardiology! Saliva Stress Test: Your saliva can tell a lot about you, including your stress levels! Billymo Rist from St Kilda Football Club shows us how he uses a simple test to find out how stressed AFL players are. It's all covered on this medically sound episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:22 | Science
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Keeping Up With Science  |  Eleven

Keeping Up with Science Keeping up with science can be tough! Luckily, SCOPE is here to lend a helping hand! We delve into the fascinating sport of drone racing, we learn how dragonflies are helping develop the latest in automated robotics and we explore the bizarre pollinating habits of the blue banded bee! Drone Racing: It's fast, furious, and it's the latest high-tech sport to take the world by storm! Join junior drone racing champion Thomas Bitmatta as he explains the ins and outs of this futuristic fascination! Dragonfly Robot: Dragonflies may be small, but their eyes actually make them one of the most efficient hunters on the planet! Zahra Bagheri from the University of Adelaide is trying to take that natural ability and use it to improve target detection and tracking in robots! DIY Science - Magnetic Slime: Slime is pretty cool on its own, but what happens when you add magnets? Join junior scientist Luci as she makes her very own slime ... that appears to have a life of its own. Chocolate Factory: We go on a tour of a chocolate factory through the eyes of engineer Kirk Jatczak. He shows us all the amazing high tech machinery he gets to work with every single day... and the chocolate. Head banging Bees: Bees play an important role in the ecosystem through pollination. But not all bees pollinate the same way. We join Dr Sridhar Ravi from RMIT as he explains the unique way in which the Australian blue-banded bee extracts pollen! It's all covered on this speedy episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:07 | Science
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Digital Tech  |  Eleven

Technology is all around us and it's constantly changing, so join Dr Rob for a techno refresher! We find out how a head band full of tech can tell us more about concussion, we delve into the past with a 3D scanner and we learn how nature can be used to inspire a drone design Brain Band: Dr Alan Pearce and Branden Wilson from Swinburne University and Cocreators have developed a device that monitors sports players and how hard they are hit while on the field to try and reduce the number of concussions in sport. 3D Scanned Tank: The Mephisto is a German tank from World War One - a piece of history that now lives here, in Australia. Chris Little, a 3D Forensic Researcher from Griffith University, is using 3D scanning technology to try and uncover what happened during the machine's final moments more than 100 years ago! DIY Science - Light Bulb: The first light bulbs were made from fossilised bamboo and a glass casing. But as Junior Scientists Madi and Lola explain, all you'll need today is an electric circuit, a couple of pencil refills and a mason jar! Unmanned Vessel: We catch up with Tenzin Crouch and Karl Sammut from Flinders University who have help to build an autonomous marine vessel. Flapping Wings Robot: When it comes to flying in the animal kingdom, one thing seems to be constant; flapping! Dr Sridhar Ravi from RMIT is trying to take the idea of flapping winged flight and implement it in drones! It's all covered on this technologically advanced episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:07 | Science
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Engineering The Future  |  Eleven

Engineering the Future We survey the scientific landscape and lay down a solid foundation of knowledge on this episode of SCOPE dedicated entirely to engineering! We explore Antarctica with a wind powered snow sail, find out what it takes to design a drone and take a closer look at the electric car chargers. Polar Sail: Most people visit the frozen continent of Antarctica to study its untouched landscape. But Charles Werb's reason for visiting was to sail across that landscape in a wind powered, self-reliant vehicle! Drone Designer: Drones come in all shapes and sizes! And as David Purser and Sam Prudden from RMIT explain that the way a drone is designed, built and tested can change drastically based on its purpose. DIY - Solar Motor: Our sun is a powerful source of energy. Join junior scientist Lachlan as he attempts to use some of that energy in the form of a model solar motor! Robotic Arm: Robots are designed to make our lives easier! And that's exactly what junior scientist Sarsha wants to do with her robotic arm which aims to help stroke victims with their rehabilitation! Electric Car Charger: A lot of things require charging these days; from phones, to laptops and now cars! Join Andrew Wilson from the University of Queensland as he walks you through some of the fastest car chargers in Australia! All that on more on a well-designed and structurally sound episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

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