24:22 | Science
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Keeping Up with Science Keeping up with science can be tough! Luckily, SCOPE is here to lend a helping hand! We delve into the fascinating sport of drone racing, we learn how dragonflies are helping develop the latest in automated robotics and we explore the bizarre pollinating habits of the blue banded bee! Drone Racing: It's fast, furious, and it's the latest high-tech sport to take the world by storm! Join junior drone racing champion Thomas Bitmatta as he explains the ins and outs of this futuristic fascination! Dragonfly Robot: Dragonflies may be small, but their eyes actually make them one of the most efficient hunters on the planet! Zahra Bagheri from the University of Adelaide is trying to take that natural ability and use it to improve target detection and tracking in robots! DIY Science - Magnetic Slime: Slime is pretty cool on its own, but what happens when you add magnets? Join junior scientist Luci as she makes her very own slime ... that appears to have a life of its own. Chocolate Factory: We go on a tour of a chocolate factory through the eyes of engineer Kirk Jatczak. He shows us all the amazing high tech machinery he gets to work with every single day... and the chocolate. Head banging Bees: Bees play an important role in the ecosystem through pollination. But not all bees pollinate the same way. We join Dr Sridhar Ravi from RMIT as he explains the unique way in which the Australian blue-banded bee extracts pollen! It's all covered on this speedy episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:07 | Science
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Eleven

Technology is all around us and it's constantly changing, so join Dr Rob for a techno refresher! We find out how a head band full of tech can tell us more about concussion, we delve into the past with a 3D scanner and we learn how nature can be used to inspire a drone design Brain Band: Dr Alan Pearce and Branden Wilson from Swinburne University and Cocreators have developed a device that monitors sports players and how hard they are hit while on the field to try and reduce the number of concussions in sport. 3D Scanned Tank: The Mephisto is a German tank from World War One - a piece of history that now lives here, in Australia. Chris Little, a 3D Forensic Researcher from Griffith University, is using 3D scanning technology to try and uncover what happened during the machine's final moments more than 100 years ago! DIY Science - Light Bulb: The first light bulbs were made from fossilised bamboo and a glass casing. But as Junior Scientists Madi and Lola explain, all you'll need today is an electric circuit, a couple of pencil refills and a mason jar! Unmanned Vessel: We catch up with Tenzin Crouch and Karl Sammut from Flinders University who have help to build an autonomous marine vessel. Flapping Wings Robot: When it comes to flying in the animal kingdom, one thing seems to be constant; flapping! Dr Sridhar Ravi from RMIT is trying to take the idea of flapping winged flight and implement it in drones! It's all covered on this technologically advanced episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:07 | Science
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Engineering the Future We survey the scientific landscape and lay down a solid foundation of knowledge on this episode of SCOPE dedicated entirely to engineering! We explore Antarctica with a wind powered snow sail, find out what it takes to design a drone and take a closer look at the electric car chargers. Polar Sail: Most people visit the frozen continent of Antarctica to study its untouched landscape. But Charles Werb's reason for visiting was to sail across that landscape in a wind powered, self-reliant vehicle! Drone Designer: Drones come in all shapes and sizes! And as David Purser and Sam Prudden from RMIT explain that the way a drone is designed, built and tested can change drastically based on its purpose. DIY - Solar Motor: Our sun is a powerful source of energy. Join junior scientist Lachlan as he attempts to use some of that energy in the form of a model solar motor! Robotic Arm: Robots are designed to make our lives easier! And that's exactly what junior scientist Sarsha wants to do with her robotic arm which aims to help stroke victims with their rehabilitation! Electric Car Charger: A lot of things require charging these days; from phones, to laptops and now cars! Join Andrew Wilson from the University of Queensland as he walks you through some of the fastest car chargers in Australia! All that on more on a well-designed and structurally sound episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:00 | Science
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Eleven

Animals and Science Collide: Join Dr Rob for a walk on the wild side as animals and science collide on this brand new episode of SCOPE! We explore the hunting habits of penguins, we predict pregnancies with roo poo and we put chickens to the test. Penguin Pack: You might think of penguins as being cute and cuddly but they’re also very effective hunters! Meet Grace Sutton from Deakin University who has spent the past 2 years studying the foraging behaviours of the world’s smallest penguin species. Poo Predictor: Gross as it may be, animal poo can tell you a lot about a species. As Dr Tamara Keeley from the University of Queensland explains, from eating habits to pregnancy, poo can be a great way of finding out how healthy an animal is. DIY Science – Whale Blubber: Whales spend a lot of their time in the icy waters of the arctic; so how do they keep warm? Junior Scientist Jacques recreates whale blubber to try and answer this very question! Tiger Cubs: Tigers are the biggest of the big cats, not that you’d know that from this story. Tiger Keeper Patrick Martin-Vegue from Dreamworld introduces us to some of the smaller members of the family- the new tiger cubs. Chicken Clicker: Susan Hazel from the University of Adelaide has been training chickens to tell the difference between red and green. It may sound odd but her research is teaching us a lot about animal behaviours and the science of learning. All that and more on an animalistic episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

24:01 | Science
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Forensic Examination The Capital of Science: There's mystery afoot this week on Scope as we investigate the science around forensics! Dr Rob makes his way out to a crime scene to get the low down on police forensic investigations, things heat up when we look at the science behind how fires are started and we find out what happens when the chemical hazard team is called out to an emergency. Scope Forensics - Crime Scene: Dr Rob heads out to a burglary and teams up with Scenes of Crime Investigator Nicole Tadina from Queensland Police Service to try and catch the culprit! Scope Forensics - Police HQ: Dr Rob's adventure into forensic science continues as he heads over to Police Headquarters to decipher fingerprints with Neil Hayes from the Fingerprint Bureau and analyse blood samples with Kane Gordon from the Queensland Police Service's scientific branch. DIY Science - Chromatography: We join junior scientists Charlie and Alex from Scotch College as they use a technique known as chromatography to help solve a crime. Fire Forensics: Fires can be both deadly and destructive, that's why it's important for people like Daren Mallouk from the Fire Investigation Unit to figure out how and why they happen. Chemical Spill: Emergencies aren't just fires, floods and felonies. Dr Damien Reid from the Fire and Rescue Scientific Branch of the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services specialises in a different kind of emergency; chemical spills! All that and more on an action-packed episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

23:58 | Science
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The Nature of Scope: On this episode of SCOPE we get back to nature with some biological, geographical and meteorological science! We extract vitamin C from kiwi fruit, we discover what bugs populate Melbourne's waterways and we take a look into the gross but oddly appetising world of edible insects. Species Saving Science: Australia is home to a multitude of rare and even endangered species and scientists like Dr Andrew Weeks from The University of Melbourne are working on new ways to keep them around for future generations. Plant Extraction: Vitamins are essential to all life, be it plant, animal or human! Dr Mark Harrison from the Queensland University of Technology explains how we're able to find out what vitamins are found in what foods. DIY Science - Rain Gauge: Rain can be annoying and can even ruin your plans! But there's no arguing it plays a vital role in our ecosystem. Junior scientist shows you how to construct you're very own rain gauge to monitor this important meteorological occurrence. Water Bugs: Nature is constantly at work! To prove it Priya Crawford-Wilson from Melbourne Water heads out to Melbourne's Darebin Creek to prove just how much life lurking beneath the surface! Edible Insects: What's your favourite food? Ice-cream? Pizza? How about cockroaches?! It may not sound appetizing but as Kerry Wilkinson from The University of Adelaide explains, insect meat could be the next big thing! So join Dr Rob for an all-natural episode of SCOPE; where the ordinary becomes extra ordinary.

24:01 | Science
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The Biological World: On this episode of SCOPE; we put our living, breathing planet under the microscope as we explore the biological world! We learn all about the bizarre looking weedy sea dragon, we take an in-depth look at our teeth and we explore how fish tell each other apart! Weedy Sea Dragon: Meet Sam Fawke from SeaLife Melbourne Aquarium, as he explains the intricacies of breeding one of the world's most bizarre looking sea creatures; the weedy sea dragon! What's in a Tooth?: Teeth aren't just great at chewing food! As Kathleen Paul from the University of Adelaide explains, they can also help scientists learn about human evolution and our collective past! DIY Science - Does your nose know?: Flowers don't just smell great to us. Their aroma is also used to attract birds and insects! But what part of the flower has the most pungent scent and why? Junior Scientist Marnie investigates! Genetic Backburning: The cane toad has been invading backyards around Australia for more than 80 years! Luckily for us, scientists like Dr Ben Phillips and Emily Gregg from Melbourne University, are working around the clock to put a halt on the spread of these pesky pests once and for all! Funny Fish Face: What do human and fish both have in common? They can recognise their friend's faces! Well, that is according to Dr Uli Siebeck from the University of Queensland! She's been researching how fish use UV patterns on their faces to recognise each other! All that and more on another enriching episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:57 | Science
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Sporty Science: Going, going, gone! Dr Rob knocks it out of the park this week with an episode of SCOPE all about the science of sports! We learn how to track our athletes every move, we hang ten with some young surfers and their latest tech and we find out what it takes to fuel a professional athlete! Science of Surfing: Join Dr Anthony Ellis from BIOLABS as he ditches the lab and test tubes for the beach and a surfboard. Hang ten, as we check out some of the latest technology that's helping bring this sport into the 21st century. How to Feed a Lion: When you're feeding a lion you have to make sure it gets just the right amount and type of food to keep it happy and healthy. Except, the lions Louise Cato feeds aren't feline predators ... they're AFL players! DIY - Hula Hoop: Hula Hooping can be a lot of fun, and the science behind it is just as entertaining. Join junior scientist Hayley as she demonstrates how you can make your very own hula hoop at home! Tracking Tech: Most modern day tracking equipment relies on GPS technology. But what do you do when you're out of range? Well, you turn to Jonathan Shepherd from Griffith University and his SABEL sense tracking device. Chronic Wounds: Some wounds can take months or even years to fully recover. But thanks to Michael Samuel from the University of South Australia we might soon have the tools to speed up this process. So hop, skip and jump into a brand new episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

24:00 | Science
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Scope in Space: Strap in and prepare for launch as Scope rockets off-planet for this special episode all about space! Dr Rob catches up with Australia's very own astronaut; Andy Thomas, we learn everything there is to know about black holes and we discover how the rockets of the future could be reusable! Aussie Astronaut: Andy Thomas grew up in Adelaide dreaming of flying in space. And then he did, not once, but four times! Dr Rob catches up with this real-life astronaut to find out exactly what it's like to float in micro-gravity! Black Holes 101: Black holes appear a lot in science fiction but how much of that translates into science fact? Join Prof Tamara Davis from the University of Queensland as she explores one of the coolest celestial phenomenon in the galaxy. DIY Science - Constellation Geo-board: There are billions of stars in the night sky and some of these stars can form patterns called constellations. Join junior scientist Joel as he shows you how to build a tool to help you identify these stellar arrangements! Gravitational Waves: Dr Rob heads out of the bunker and to the Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex to catch up with Glen Nagle as they discuss the latest and greatest discovery in the field of astrophysics; gravitational waves! Reusable Rockets: Rockets are engineering wonders, but they can usually only be used once! Prof Michael Smart from the University of Queensland is hoping to change all that with a rocket prototype which can be reused time and time again! All that and more on an out-of-this-world episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:56 | Science
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Season 3  |  Episode 108  |  Eleven

Fast Paced Science: Watch out! This one's coming in fast! Join Dr Rob as he hurtles towards some fantastically fascinating science with an episode set at a slightly faster pace! We find out what it takes to keep a race car driver healthy, we get an insight into the future of high speed transportation and we get bowled over by some pink cricket balls! High-Speed Hydration: Race car drivers know how to turn up the speed! But in doing so, they also turn up the heat! Meet Justin Holland from the University of Queensland as he explains how heat and hydration affects those who have a need for speed! Space X Winners: Whizzing along in an air tight tube faster than a plane may sound like something from science fiction! But as David Purser from RMIT explains, he's designed a pod which could see this futuristic transportation soon become science fact! DIY Science - Balloon Race: 3, 2, 1, GO! Join junior scientists Indigo and Siobhan as they race balloons thanks to thrust. Shaping Shoes: When it comes to professional running, the right shoe can make all the difference. Meet Christopher Bishop from the University of South Australia who is using 3D modelling to help design the sneakers of the future. Pink Cricket Balls: Cricket balls come in a variety of colours; red, white and now ... pink! Join Ross Thompson from Kookaburra Australia as he explains just how these cricket balls make it from the factory to the field! Don't blink or you'll miss all that and more, on a seriously speedy episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:51 | Science
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Season 3  |  Episode 107  |  Eleven

Healthy Science: Open wide and say 'ahh' as Dr Rob feeds you you're weekly dosage of science with a prescribed episode of SCOPE! Dr Rob heads out of the bunker to visit Australia's first fully digital hospital, we check out a device that's turning tedious breathing exercises into an exciting tablet game and we explore the science behind healthy bones! Bionic Spine: Usually when you break a bone, your body can repair it in a couple of months. But when it comes to the spine, breaking a bone can rob someone of their ability to walk! That's why Dr Nick Opie and Gil Rind from the University of Melbourne are working on a device which could one day help paraplegics get back on their feet. Digital Hospital: What is a digital hospital? Dr Rob caught up with Dr Clair Sullivan from the Princess Alexandra Hospital to find out! Join him, as he finds out how this 21st century hospital made the transition from the tangible to the digital! DIY Science - Fake Snot: Snot is gross, but it plays an important role in the body's immune system! Join junior scientist Phoebe, as she whips up a batch of fake snot that has the same consistency and viscosity as the real thing! Cyber Gaming for Cystic Fibrosis: As you can imagine, an hour of repetitive breathing exercises every single day can become a tedious ordeal! But unfortunately, that's the fate that awaits the countless children living with cystic fibrosis. Elliot Smith from the University of Queensland has developed a device that turns these dreary breathing exercises into a fun video game! Bone Health: Your skeletal system is one of the most important parts of your body. And Paul Anderson and Jackson Ryan from the University of South Australia, are researching new ways to keep your bones in tip-top shape! All that and more on a very health-conscience episode of SCOPE: where the ordinary becomes extraordinary!

23:58 | Science
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Season 3  |  Episode 106  |  Eleven

Science Au Naturel: Sometimes it's good to take a step back, smell the roses and appreciate all thing au naturel. On this special episode of SCOPE, we take an in-depth look at the natural world! There's a sea plant revival, we learn how captive penguins keep cool and we travel around the world without actually leaving the room. Crayweed Revival: Forests are an integral part of many ecosystems. But did you know they exist both above and below water? Join Dr Adriana Verges, Dr Alexandra Campbell and Dr Ziggy Marzinelli as they explain how they're helping repopulate and maintain one of the largest underwater forests of the coast of Sydney. Environmental Home: Houses come in all shapes and sizes; but this house is rather special. As Tony O'Connell from TS constructions explains this house is one of the most energy efficient in Australia! DIY Science - Make a Terrarium: If you locked a plant away in a jar, you'd expect it to perish rather quickly. However, as DIY scientist Charlotte discovers, in a closed terrarium plants can recycle their old water almost indefinitely! Home Away from Home: Australia's climate is a far fetch from Antarctica's frozen tundras. So how do you take care of Antarctica's most famous birds when they call Australia home? Well, as Tanith Davis from Sea Life explains, it takes a lot of ice and a powerful freezer! Virtual Reality Conservations: Imagine if you could travel all over the world without ever leaving your seat! What would you do? Well, Professor Kerrie Mengersen has that power in the form of virtual reality! And she's using it to help save endangered animals around the world.

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