24:52 | News and current affairs
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Dateline

SBS

A year into its fledgling democracy, many in Burma fear the political freedoms and peace Aung San Suu Kyi brought to the country are already under attack. In November 2015, after years of military rule a civilian government led by Aung San Suu Kyi was elected in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Hopes were high at the time, but many in the country now fear the peace and freedom they were promised is already slipping away. Earlier this year, the shaky foundation of Myanmar's new democracy was revealed in a brutal way, when a close adviser to Suu Kyi was murdered. While waiting for a car outside Yangon airport, U Ko Ni was shot in the back of the head twice, at almost point blank range, while holding his three-year-old grandson. He died instantly. Myanmar's government called the killing a terrorist act, carried out with the direct purpose of undermining the country's stability. Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) said it was aimed at the party's policies. Many in Myanmar believe Ko Ni was killed as a result of his opposition to the military's continued control of the country's defense, home affairs and border security - and that the hit was ordered by a former military officer. In this week's Dateline, human rights lawyer Robert San Aung tells reporter Krishnan Guru-Murphy he suspects Ko Ni's murder was an act of vengeance from prominent figures in military intelligence.

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