24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

5/04/2011  |  ABC

PARTY POLITICS The Federal election was close... and now things are split at the state level too with each party having 3 state Premiers. Are Australian voters really divided? Or could it be that the political parties are often so similar that it's hard to choose between them? We look at what each party was originally created to represent... and we examine why things aren't so clear cut these days. ROYAL FAMILY The wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton is in a few weeks. A new survey suggests that all the build-up has made the Royal family more popular in the UK. But what about in Australia? Tash looks at the pros and cons of Australia being under a monarchy. GREEN TEA Drinking green tea has for a long time been considered to be good for your health. What started as a huge industry in Asia has moved over to a small part of Australia. It's taken about a decade, but Aussie farmers reckon they could be brewing the best green tea harvest yet. Kirsty looks into how it's grown and what it does for our bodies. EASTER SYMBOLS As it's the last BtN before Easter we thought we'd take a closer look at the way Australians celebrate this holiday. For some people it's an important religious celebration...for others it's about chocolate eggs and the Easter bunny. We explain some of the meanings behind the traditions. HAND BALL You've probably played handball at school before... but did you know that there's a real sport called handball and it's even played at the Olympics. It's a big hit in Europe and it's becoming more popular over here too. We catch up with a group of young handball players and take you through some of the rules.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

29/03/2011  |  ABC

LIBYA STRIKE While the fighting was raging on in Libya between Colonel Gaddafi's supporters and those that want him out... another fight was going on a long way away from there. But this battle was very different. It was between people in a meeting room, and the outcome has changed the whole course of the Libya war. Nathan examines the UN's role in the Libya conflict. CHRISTMAS ISLAND Anyone watching the news over the last few years, would be forgiven for thinking that Christmas Island was nothing more than a great big detention centre. But there's so much more to this Australian Island. A group of school kids from Christmas Island make a video for BtN to show what life is really like for the community that live there. DUCK HUNTING It's that time of year when you wouldn't want to be mistaken for a duck. Duck hunting season is underway in some parts of Australia and it's got a lot of people in a flap. Animal rights groups want the sport to be banned.. but hunters say it's fun and great for the economy. CHOCOLATE UNWRAPPED Easter is just around the corner, and it's a huge day for the chocolate industry. But what else is underneath those glossy wrappers? Well it depends on the type of chocolate, whether it's dark, milk or white. Kirsty unwraps one of our favourite foods to find out exactly how it's made. BALLET BOYS We catch up with a group of boys who love ballet. They want to dispel the myth that ballet is just for girls. We find out that it takes an incredible amount of strength to be a good ballet dancer, with one study even suggesting they're fitter than professional swimmers.

24:30 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

15/02/2011  |  ABC

TEEN OBESITY New research shows a quarter of Australian teens are overweight, and 85% aren't doing enough exercise. Health experts are warning it's likely to lead to a decline in life expectancy, and an increase in illnesses like heart disease. DISASTER INSURANCE In the last month many people have been affected by devastating floods, cyclone or bushfires. Sometimes homes have been ruined and possessions damaged. So who pays for all that to be replaced? We look at how insurance works. SATELLITES If you watched news coverage of Cyclone Yasi, you would have noticed the constant use of weather images to predict the path of the storm. So, how do we actually see that stuff, and what are the different types of satellite? MOBILE PHONES It's already against the law to use a mobile phone while driving, but now politicians are talking about banning the hands-free option too. People who use their cars for work say a ban would be bad for business, because they take lots of calls from customers while driving. Would a ban be a good idea, if it makes our roads safer? We explore all sides of the argument. REEL SPORT It's one of the most popular participation sports in Australia, yet it rarely features on the back pages of the newspaper, and most people would struggle to name the current world champion. So why is it that the sport of FISHING so often flies under the radar?

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

8/02/2011  |  ABC

CYCLONE A massive cyclone is about to hit the north Queensland coast. People are already being evacuated from their homes as devastation is predicted. But what exactly are cyclones? And how do they happen? EGYPT Egypt is known as the place of the pyramids and the Great Sphinx. But while we know a lot about the country's past... its future is less clear. Egypt is going through a political revolution which has seen thousands of people protesting in the streets. What does it mean for the region? NEWS 24 The previous stories have demonstrated how quickly a news story can break, and how important it can be to have the latest information. We look behind the scenes at the ABC's 24 hour news channel. We speak to presenters and producers and find out what it's like to work on the channel that never sleeps. CINEMA The Oscars are just a few weeks away and it's the hot topic on many people's lips. But have you ever wondered how films are actually beamed into our cinemas, once they're made? Tash snuck behind the scenes of a cinema to find out how it all works. SPRINT STARS We meet two young sprint stars who have more in common than just their love for running. Both athletes lost a leg recently and have started learning to run with the aid of a prosthetic replacement. Already they're winning medals. This is an inspirational story about winning against the odds.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

16/11/2010  |  ABC

AIRCRAFT GROUNDED Bits of aircraft dropping off in mid-air is always concerning and has resulted in the grounding of the new Qantas A380 super-jumbo. Amid the finger-pointing over who's to blame Kirsty looks at what it takes to keep these complex machines in the air. BANK BUSINESS People are really angry at the banks after one decided to charge more for their loans. Many have said that banks are too greedy and already make big enough profits. Nathan looks at the business of banks to find out what they're really all about. FREE RANGE PIGS The Australian pork industry is about to vote on whether to get rid the cages where pregnant pigs are kept until they give birth. 95% of farmers still use the cages and there's a push to get more 'free range' pigs on farms. Tash finds out what makes a product 'free range' and how to tell if we're buying the real deal. HIGH DEFINITION TV As the switch to full digital in 2013 approaches people are turfing out the old telly and discovering a raft of new channels. There's loads of new jargon with terms like SD, HD and full-HD being tossed around. So this week Tash looks at what's on offer and what it is that makes HDTV different from the rest. PODCLASS School kids in Italy have taken on a new subject called podclass. Their ex-DJ teacher has injected some new technology and turned some of the kids' least-favourite lessons into fun. Tash tunes in to find out what it is that makes podclass such a hit.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

2/11/2010  |  ABC

TSUNAMI We've been reminded again of the devastating force of a tsunami. The Indonesian island of Sumatra was hit after a massive earthquake triggered a 3-metre wave that has killed over 100 people and hundreds more are still missing. Tash explains how tsunamis are caused and what systems are in place to warn people they're coming. MADE IN CHINA Workers are in hospital after being exposed to a toxic chemical while gluing computer stickers on laptops. This week Kirsty looks at how China's booming economy is affecting its people and the environment? VIDEO RENTAL For ages the local video shop has been offering up a good night's entertainment. But with the internet now becoming a convenient and fast place to pick a flick, where does that leave the good old DVD shop? With no need to go out and never any late fees, Nathan looks at the reasons why the DVD might be doomed. SEA CUCUMBER Animal, vegetable or mineral? These bizarre-looking creatures are like the vacuum cleaners of the sea. They're also considered a delicacy and are the new stars of the Vietnamese aquaculture industry. Tash introduces us to some kids and their families who are farming the beastie with no brain! ROBOT SOLDIERS Some kids are developing what could be the next generation of battlefield robots. Working with a university they are inventing new ways to suss out threats or bombs in a war zone. Kirsty met up with the brains behind these remote controlled soldiers.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

26/10/2010  |  ABC

DETENTION CENTRES The government's announced that two new detention centres will open in Australia. Community opinions are polarised so this week Tash looks at the way asylum seekers have been accommodated in the past and how those with kids will soon be housed. AFGHANISTAN DEBATE Australia joined the war effort in Afghanistan nine years ago and only now have pollies got around to debating the pros and cons of it all. Should soldiers to stay right where they are until the mission is finished? Nathan takes a look at the arguments both sides used to make their point. BROADBAND If you can't tell a Megabit from a Megabyte then this story is for you. We crack the broadband code and explain that all 'high-speed' connections are not created equal! Kirsty logs on to the current offerings and compares them with what the National Broadband Network promises to deliver. HAY FEVER SEASON Thanks to a change in season lots of kids are suffering from hay fever. Tash did some investigating to find out how this annoying allergy affects people and more importantly, what can be done to help ease the symptoms. WOLVES From fairy tales to feature films wolves get a pretty bad rap. And they're not too popular with ranchers in some parts of the US either! Kirsty looks at the efforts to rebuild the wolf population in the state of Idaho and why local farmers are so angry about the plan.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind The News

19/10/2010  |  ABC

BASIN PLAN It grows 40-percent of all the food we produce in this country and sustains 30,000 wetlands. But the Murray Darling basin is under severe stress. Both sides agree there is a problem and Nathan looks at the plan to get the farming and environment balance right. CHILE RESCUE Chile's 33 trapped miners will enjoy life above ground after spending 10-weeks stuck in the San Jose mine. Some will become stars with book deals and spots on popular TV shows, so Kirsty explores how the miners were pulled to safety and how their lives will change. NEWSPAPERS Last week we tuned into the world of radio and now we open up the pages of the newspaper business. Papers are a big segment of the mass media but with mobile communications invading our lives Tash finds out if print is facing extinction. FRED'S VAN Imagine not having a clean bed and lots of food to come home to. Each day around 1 in every 200 Aussies faces that situation. But thanks to charity organisations and volunteers, homeless and disadvantaged people are being given a helping hand. Tash meets some kids working in Fred's Van who are making a difference. RODEO KIDS Jumping on the back of a bucking bull or a wild horse is not something a lot of kids would call fun! But for some people rodeos aren't only an adrenalin rush, they're a serious career. The sport is rounding up more interested kids and as Kirsty reports it can even help them sort out a few personal problems.

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