24:38 | Published 1 month ago
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Behind the News

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June 18, 2019

Press Freedom Recently there's been a lot of talk in the media about the media! Earlier this month the house of a News Corp journalist and the offices of the ABC were raided by the Australia Federal Police. They were investigating possible crimes that they said were committed when people gave secret information to journalists. But some say the raids are a bad thing for freedom of the press. We look at what press freedom is, why it's important and why its sometimes controversial. Aboriginal Flag Debate Last week there was some debate about the Aboriginal flag and who should be able to use it. It came after the AFL and several companies were asked to stop selling clothing with the flag on it. We look at the history of the flag and who has the right to sell its image and why. Refugee Week Thursday is World Refugee Day, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the millions of people who have to leave their homes because of war, persecution or disaster. We find out more about what it means to be a refugee and meet a family who came to Australia as refugees. Gender and Sport A female footy player in South Australia has been given a six-week ban after she filled in a local men's team. It got many asking whether women should be allowed to compete alongside men in Aussie Rules and other games. Bigfoot Last week there was big news about ... Bigfoot! For decades there have been stories about the famous hairy creature, and some swear they've seen it roaming around forests in the US. But last week Bigfoot was dealt a big blow when the FBI released new information about its own hunt for Sasquatch. We find out more about Bigfoot and some other mythical creatures around the world.

News and current affairs

24:29 | Published 1 month ago
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Behind the News

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June 11, 2019

Interest Rates Last week Australia's interest rates were brought to an all-time low by the Reserve Bank. While that might not sound that interesting, it's something that could affect all of Australia. We find out why interest rates are so important and why the Reserve Bank thinks carefully before changing them. Tiananmen Square Anniversary Last week people around the world have marked the anniversary of a tragic event that happened in China 30 years ago. It's known as the Tiananmen Square massacre. But while it's famous in many countries, like Australia, the events of June 4, 1989, aren't talked about much by people in China. We find out more about what happened in Tiananmen Square and how it's remembered by Chinese people. Meditation We find out about a plan to make school a little more relaxing! In the last budget the government put money towards a program that teaches kids mindfulness and meditation. It's an ancient practice that, according to some experts, can have a big effect on your mental health. Camel Cuddles As far as pets go, camels might seem an unusual choice, but one family in Ipswich says their domestic dromedary is a great companion. They're encouraging other Aussies to adopt camels as a way of fighting Australia's feral pest problem. We find out more about Australia's wild camels and whether they could find a place in farmer's paddocks. Icy Adventure We meet two brothers, Monty and Ziggy, who have just come back from an epic overseas challenge. They set out to cross-country ski across the Arctic, even though they'd never skied before!

News and current affairs

24:30 | Published 1 month ago
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Behind the News

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June 4, 2019

Adani Update Adani is a word that you would have heard a lot if you've been listening to the news lately. It was a big issue during the recent election campaign and it's still causing a lot of debate. So what is it? We find out more about Adani, its plans for the Carmichael coal mine, and why it's been causing a lot of debate for a long time. Everest Debate For many, climbing the world's highest mountain is the ultimate achievement, but are too many taking on the peak? That's the question many are asking after a horror start to the climbing season. 11 people have died on Everest this year and last week an Australian man was rescued on its slopes. We find out why the mountain is so dangerous and why climbing it has become controversial. Place Names Some significant landmarks in Hobart could soon get some new names. As an act of reconciliation, the city council is thinking of adopting names in the language of the area's traditional owners - Palawa Kani. We look at how places get their names and why cities and towns around Australia are adopting Aboriginal names. Young Inventor We meet Max, a 13-year-old who's just won an international award for his high-tech compost bin. It's not the only thing Max has invented. He shows us some of his creations and tells us why he loves to solve problems with STEM. Eid Al-Fitr Next week millions of Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid Al-Fitr. It's an important Islamic holiday and marks the end of Ramadan. As part of our series looking at major religious holidays, we meet some kids who tell us about their religion and how they'll be celebrating Eid.

News and current affairs

24:38 | Published 1 month ago
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Behind the News

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May 28, 2019

Opinion Polls The recent federal election has many people asking big questions about opinion polls. They've been used for nearly 200 years to get an idea of how the public feels about their leaders but recently there've been some big votes around the world with very different results to what the opinion polls predicted. We look at how polls work and why they might be less accurate than they used to be. Mabo Legacy Next week is Reconciliation Week - a time to think about the shared history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-indigenous Australians. The week ends with Mabo Day on June 3, which celebrates the life and work of Eddie Mabo who fought to disprove terra nullius, the idea Australia was unoccupied before European colonisation. We look at the life and legacy of Mabo. Flu Season As the weather gets cooler, medical experts are warning people to get vaccinated to avoid getting the flu. They say this season has already been a particularly bad one. We find out what the flu is and how vaccinations can help to protect us. Underwater Research Scientists have been exploring the deep water off the coast of Tasmania and examining the fascinating creatures that live there. But before they did, they went to a local school to teach students about the weird world of the deep. Icy Adventure We meet two brothers, Monty and Ziggy, who have just come back from an epic overseas challenge. They set out to cross-country ski across the arctic, even though they'd never skied before!

News and current affairs

24:30 | Published 3 months ago
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Behind the News

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April 2, 2019

Living Wage Last week there was a lot of talk about wages after Labor announ ced that, if it’s elected, it will raise the minimum wage and try to bring in a living wage. So, what is a minimum wage and what’s a living wage? And why is talk about raising it always controversial? Trolling Recently there’ve been a couple of big news stories involving Australian sports stars and online trolls. Both Carlton forward Tayla Harris, and West Coast player Liam Ryan have been the subject of abusive messages that many say come from trolls. So, what are trolls and what’s the best way to deal with them? Gambling in Games Last week the Victorian government launched a program designed to reduce the risk of kids being exposed to gambling through popular video games. It comes after a study showed that almost half of Australia’s top games have features that could be called gambling. Exo-Planets A team of international astronomers who are putting together an encyclopaedia of exo-planets has just announce that their list of alien worlds just tipped 4001! That’s exciting news, especially given that less than 30 years ago we didn’t know if there were any planets outside of our solar system. We take a look at what exo-planets are and why astronomers are so keen on tracking them down. Lent Right now, thousands of Christians in Australia are in the middle of an important religious festival. It’s called Lent and it usually involves fasting or giving something up for 40 days. We talk to some kids who are observing Lent to find out more about it and why it’s important to them.

News and current affairs

24:30 | Published 4 months ago
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Behind the News

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March 12, 2019

Kashmir Conflict In the past few weeks there’s been some tension between two big countries: India and Pakistan. There’s been some fighting in an area that sits between the two countries known as Kashmir. It’s not the first time Kashmir’s been at the centre of conflict. This week we look at the reasons behind the trouble in Kashmir and troubled relationship between India and Pakistan. Plastic Ban Hobart has become the first capital city in the nation to ban single-use plastics, including takeaway food containers and straws. It’s something many other cities and government are looking at doing to try to stop plastic pollution which, according to a new report, is set to double in the next decade. We look at the problem of plastic pollution and the debate over plastic bans. TikTok Trouble The popular social app TikTok is in big trouble. It's just been hit with a fine for not protecting the privacy of its younger users. While you’re supposed to be 13 to use it some TikTok fans were younger than that and now many have had their accounts deleted. We look at what happened, find out why social media has age restrictions, and ask kids what they think. Antarctica Special (Part 1): Life in Antarctica BTN reporter Emma Davis has been on a journey to one of the world’s most remote and amazing places: Antarctica! She’s been meeting the people that live and work there and finding out why the frozen continent is so important to science. She’s also been trying to find out the answers to kids’ questions about Antarctica and over the next few weeks she’ll be sharing what she found. This week we’ll find out what it to get to Antarctica and what it’s like to live on Australia’s Casey Station. World’s Greatest Shave This week thousands of Australians will be taking part in a fundraiser called the World’s Greatest Shave. They’ll be shaving or colouring their hair to raise money for research into leukemia, a type of blood cancer that affects many Australians. Amongst the participants is 12-year-old Jack, the son of ABC sports presenter Paul Kennedy. He’s going to tell us why he’s taking part and why leukemia research is so important.

News and current affairs

24:30 | Published 4 months ago
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Behind the News

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March 5, 2019

Phone Ban Recently New South Wales became the first Aussie state to announce a ban on mobile phones in state primary schools. The government says it’s about keeping kids safe from online bullies and keeping them focused on their work, but not everyone agrees. Martin has a look at the mobile debate here in Australia and overseas and finds out what kids think about phones in schools. Women in Politics Next Friday is International Women’s Day, which is dedicated to celebrating women’s achievements and promoting gender equality around the world. To mark it, BTN is going to look back at the history of women in Australian politics - from the women who fought for the right to vote to our current female leaders and efforts to attract the next generation of women to politics. Palm Oil Zoos Victoria has announced it’s going to stop selling products that sell palm oil. It’s a type of oil that’s commonly used in many things, from chocolate to soap, but many conservationists say it’s having a big impact on orangutans, whose forest homes are often cut down for palm oil plantations. Rat Island Imagine trying to rid a whole island of rat! That was the big job that a group of scientists set themselves when they travelled to a remote island in the Pacific Ocean called Reiono. Carl went along to find out about the project and learn why introduced pests are such a problem. Breakdancing There were a lot of excited break-dancers last week when it was announced that it will probably be included in the 2024 Olympics Games! Jack goes to meet some young break-dancers to find out more about what it is, where it comes from, and why it deserves to be seen as a serious sport.

News and current affairs

24:30 | Published 4 months ago
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Behind the News

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February 26, 2019

Cyber Attacks There’s been a lot of talk about cyber safety in Australia after the computer networks of parliament and several political parties were broken into by overseas criminals. We look at what happened, what cybercrime is and what ordinary people can do to stay safe. Sports Pay Gap The heads of Australia’s biggest sporting organisations came together last week to release a plan which they reckon could be a world first. They want to work to reduce the pay gap between men and women in professional sport. We find out more about that pay gap and what’s being done to make sport fairer in Australia. Oscars History On Monday movie lovers around the world will be tuning in to Hollywood’s biggest night: the annual Academy Awards. We take a look back at the history of the awards and find out why they’re such a big deal, why they’re called the Oscars, and why they’re sometimes controversial. Space Clean-up Scientists and engineers have just taken a giant leap forward in the fight to clean up outer-space! A company from the UK has successfully tested a spacecraft designed to harpoon pieces of space junk so they can be pulled out of orbit. That’s really important because experts say space junk poses a serious and growing threat to humans in space and here on Earth. Circus Abyssinia Jack meets the young performers of Circus Abyssinia, Ethiopia’s first circus troupe. He finds out how the group got started and what it’s like to travel the world as a circus performer.

News and current affairs

24:29 | Published 5 months ago
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Behind the News

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February 12, 2019

Fires and floods In the past few weeks people in different parts of Australia have been dealing with very different but very destructive natural disasters. In Tasmania bushfires have destroyed homes as well as huge areas of the native forest. Meanwhile Townsville is mopping up after major floods last week. Amelia had a look at these natural disasters and how they're affecting local kids. Extreme Weather Over the holidays we've heard a lot about extreme weather events, from the heatwaves that hit during Australia's hottest-ever January to a polar vortex which set temperatures plummeting in the US. Our new reporter, Martin, goes to find out more about the weather and whether we can expect more of this to come. Murray-Darling warning There are serious worries about the health of Australia's biggest river system - the Murray-Darling. Recently millions of fish died near the town of Menindee in NSW because of an outbreak of blue green algae caused by a lack of water flowing down the Darling. While the government blames the drought a new report from South Australia says more needs to be done to protect the rivers. Storm girl You might have seen the recent movie Storm Boy, about a kid that befriends a pelican. Well, this week we meet a real-life Storm Girl. 12-year-old rookie reporter Shalise tells us about her friendship with pelicans and the work that she's done to protect their homes. Symphony school Have you ever wondered what it takes to be part of an orchestra? A group of Australia's top young musicians have been finding out. During the holidays they took part in the Australian Youth Orchestra's National Music Camp, making music together and learning about how to make music a career.

News and current affairs

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