24:30 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC ME

Fire Season It’s been a terrible start to spring for many communities in NSW and Queensland where bushfires have destroyed homes and property. While fires aren’t unusual in Australia, experts say these ones have hit way earlier than usual, in places that aren’t usually affected by fire. We find out more about this terrible start to fire season and how some kids are getting ready for the hot weather to come. Fish Rescue A mass fish rescue is underway right now in the Darling River in NSW. Native species are being caught and relocated to other parts of the river or to fish hatcheries to try to prevent what the State’s environment minister has described as a potential fish “Armageddon”. Many are worried, when summer comes, we’ll see another mass fish die-off caused by blue green algae. We find out more about what’s happening to the health of Australia’s biggest river system. E-cigarette Warning Most young Aussies know about the dangers of smoking, but there are worries that there’s a growing number of young people using e-cigarettes or vaping. While they were originally marketed as being a safer alternative to cigarettes, recently there’ve been a few cases of people getting sick after vaping and even some deaths overseas. We find out more. Peace Games It’s not very often that 11-year-olds are asked to prevent wars and solve big economic, social and environmental crises, but this week that’s exactly what some South Australia kids are being asked to do. They’re taking part in the World Peace Game - a very different sort of board game developed by a US educator who’s on a mission to prove that kids can make great diplomats. Magpie Season It’s that time of year again - when school yards and streets are menaced by swooping magpies! We find out why magpies attack and what you can do to protect yourself.

24:30 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC ME

Hurricane Dorian The Bahamas have been battered by the fiercest hurricane to hit the islands since records began. Hurricane Dorian was category 5 when it made landfall - the strongest category there is. We look at how hurricanes work, how they’re measured and how people are coping with the disaster. Trade Wars You might have heard on the news over the past few months about something called a trade war that’s going on between the US and China. The countries aren’t really 'at war' - but they are having a serious disagreement about tariffs and it’s having an effect on economies around the world - including here in Australia. We find out what tariffs are and how they’re being used as a weapon by the world’s most powerful countries. Human Evolution Scientists are really excited about a new find in Ethiopia. It's a 3.8 million-year-old skull belonging to one of our oldest ancestors and they hope it'll give us a much better understanding of human evolution. Matt find out more about the find and how humans became humans. NASA fossils Scientists from NASA and the ESA have been in Western Australia’s Pilbara region learning how to collect the best rock samples from the surface of Mars! Both space agencies are planning unmanned missions to the red planet which will involve collecting Martian rock samples and looking for signs of ancient Martian life. So that they know what to look for, they’re learning more about ancient Australian rocks which hold clues to the beginnings of life on Earth. Worm Wee We meet some school kids who’ve made a business out of worm wee! While it might not sound too tasty to us, plants love the liquid created by earthworms and so do gardeners. The students from Mercedes College teach us more about worms and how they help the soil to stay healthy.

24:38 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Prime Minister Interview Scott Morrison visits the BTN studio for a one-on-one interview. We ask him a selection of questions sent in by our YouTube subscribers and Ask a Reporter audience, covering a range of topics, from the government’s environmental policy to the PM’s favourite superhero. Concussion Treatment Steve Smith has confirmed he won’t be playing in the third Ashes Test in the UK after getting a concussion in the second match in the series. We look at what a concussion is and why experts say Smith’s decision sends the right message to other sports people and to kids. Nuclear Tests Thursday is the International Day Against Nuclear Tests, which was set up 10 years ago by the United Nations to raise awareness about the effects of testing nuclear weapons. We look at the history of nuclear testing and the effect it’s had on people around the world, including here in Australia. Buying Territories The eyes of the world were on a Danish island in the Arctic this week after US President Donald Trump suggested that he’d be interested in buying Greenland. Denmark and Greenlanders themselves were quick to tell the president the territory is not for sale. But it’s not the first time the US has tried to buy the island. In fact, the US has a long history of buying other countries’ territories. Toilet Renovations If you think of the most exciting or pleasant room in your school, chances are it won’t be the toilets! But we find out about a project that’s aiming to change that. Its organisers are giving toilets make-overs so kids have a pleasant place to pee!

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Gun Control Debate The gun debate is big news again in the US after two deadly shootings in early August. The US has the highest rate of gun ownership in the world and the right to bear arms is guaranteed in its constitution. Some say that's contributing to gun violence and that the US should bring in tighter controls on guns. We look at the debate in the US and the history of gun control here in Australia. Supermarket Collectable Controversy Supermarket chains Coles and Woolworths recently started new collectable campaigns and many kids around Australia are searching for the ultimate Ooshie or Little Shop toy. But not everyone is a fan of the promotions. We meet some young people who say the toys are giving kids the wrong message about plastic pollution. Science Lessons This week is Science Week and the theme is Destination Moon, to coincide with last month's 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing. It got us thinking about all the other scientific breakthroughs that've been made since 1969 and the things kids were taught at school back then that are no longer true. We look at some of the big science lessons we've learned since 1969 and how they've changed the world. Braille Books A school for kids who are blind or vision impaired in Adelaide was frustrated with the lack of braille books for students, so it's started making its own! Volunteers help to emboss the books and add tactile pictures. We meet some of the students who are enjoying the books and find out more about braille. Koala Carer We meet a young Aussie who spends her spare time caring for her favourite animal - koalas! Libby is worried that the iconic native animals are at risk of disappearing and she didn't want to wait until she was older to do something about it.

24:39 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Garma Festival 2019 Last weekend thousands of Aussies headed to North East Arnhem Land for the Garma festival. It's an annual celebration of Yolngu and other Indigenous cultures and an important forum for talking about the issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As usual, there were plenty of young Australians at Garma and we asked some of them to show us around and tell us why the festival is important to them. Constitutional Recognition At this year's Garma Festival there was a lot of talk about constitutional recognition. For a long time, many Indigenous and non-Indigenous Aussies have been calling for some changes to the constitution and now the prime minister has promised it'll soon be taken to a vote. We find out more about what constitutional recognition means and how it could be achieved. Sports Supplements Warning Last week some experts warned athletes about the risk of sports supplements after swimmer Shayna Jack tested positive to a banned substance. She says she doesn't know how a banned drug got into her system, but she suggested it might have been a contaminated batch of supplement. We look at why sports people take supplements, how they're different to banned drugs and why they can be risky. Fatbergs This week Olivia takes a closer look at what we flush down the loo! While that might seem obvious (and unpleasant) the organisation in charge of South Australia's sewerage system says a lot of people aren't getting the message. It says things like "flushable" wipes (which aren't actually flushable!) are creating big, gross blockages known as "fatbergs" in sewerage pipes. It's even released a jingle to remind people of what should and shouldn't go down the toilet. Radiated Tortoises We go to the zoo to meet some very cute tortoises which had a lucky escape from poachers. Their species is targeted by animal traffickers who sell them for their shells, their meat or as pets. We find out more about animal trafficking and what's being done to stop it.

24:31 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

UK Prime Minister Last week people all around the world were talking about the UK's new PM. His name is Boris Johnson and while he's been in politics for a long time he's known as an unconventional leader with a big personality and an unusual hairdo! We find out more about who Boris Johnson is and why his leadership could have a big impact on the UK and other countries. FaceApp and Privacy You might have seen a lot of pictures passed around recently of your friends or celebrities looking much older than they are. They come from a popular app called FaceApp which lets users change their appearance. But it's caused controversy because of terms and conditions which allow FaceApp to store and sell your photos. We find out more about data collection, why companies do it and how you can protect your privacy online. Uluru Tourists One of Australia's most famous natural wonders has been busier than usual lately. Heaps of tourists have been travelling to Uluru, with many hoping to climb the famous rock before a ban comes in in October. Some locals say it's led to an increase in rubbish and illegal camping in the area. We look at what's been happening and why the climbing ban has been put in place. MS Readathon This month primary school kids across Australia will be sticking their noses in as many books as possible for the MS Readathon. They'll be raising money to help people who live with a condition called multiple sclerosis or MS. We meet some kids who'll be doing the readathon and find out why it means a lot to them. Girls Rock We meet some kids who've spent part of their school holidays learning how to be rock stars! They took part in a program called Girls Rock which is designed to show kids that music is for everyone.

24:30 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

BTN Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11! July 21 marked 50 years since Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made history by walking on the moon. To celebrate, BTN will present a special episode, hosted from the CSIRO Parkes Radio Telescope. We'll look at the events leading up to the moon landing, the Apollo 11 mission and Australia's role in it and what the future of space exploration might hold. Space Race We look at the scientific developments and the world events that created the space race between the US and the USSR and the space milestones that paved the way for Apollo 11. Apollo 11 We find out more about the journey of Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin as they did what no human had ever done before. Moon Landing Memories Some kids interview their grandparents and great-grandparents and ask them what they remember of the moon landing and how they felt about it at the time. History of the Dish We find out more about the important role Australia played in the Apollo 11 mission, and how the CSIRO's Parkes Radio Telescope ended up providing pictures of the historic moment to the world. We also talk to an expert about what the telescope has done since Apollo 11 and what its role will be in the future. Space Future We look at the future of space exploration and meet some high school kids who are learning what it might be like to work on a mission to Mars.

24:38 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Press Freedom Recently there's been a lot of talk in the media about the media! Earlier this month the house of a News Corp journalist and the offices of the ABC were raided by the Australia Federal Police. They were investigating possible crimes that they said were committed when people gave secret information to journalists. But some say the raids are a bad thing for freedom of the press. We look at what press freedom is, why it's important and why its sometimes controversial. Aboriginal Flag Debate Last week there was some debate about the Aboriginal flag and who should be able to use it. It came after the AFL and several companies were asked to stop selling clothing with the flag on it. We look at the history of the flag and who has the right to sell its image and why. Refugee Week Thursday is World Refugee Day, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the millions of people who have to leave their homes because of war, persecution or disaster. We find out more about what it means to be a refugee and meet a family who came to Australia as refugees. Gender and Sport A female footy player in South Australia has been given a six-week ban after she filled in a local men's team. It got many asking whether women should be allowed to compete alongside men in Aussie Rules and other games. Bigfoot Last week there was big news about ... Bigfoot! For decades there have been stories about the famous hairy creature, and some swear they've seen it roaming around forests in the US. But last week Bigfoot was dealt a big blow when the FBI released new information about its own hunt for Sasquatch. We find out more about Bigfoot and some other mythical creatures around the world.

24:29 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Interest Rates Last week Australia's interest rates were brought to an all-time low by the Reserve Bank. While that might not sound that interesting, it's something that could affect all of Australia. We find out why interest rates are so important and why the Reserve Bank thinks carefully before changing them. Tiananmen Square Anniversary Last week people around the world have marked the anniversary of a tragic event that happened in China 30 years ago. It's known as the Tiananmen Square massacre. But while it's famous in many countries, like Australia, the events of June 4, 1989, aren't talked about much by people in China. We find out more about what happened in Tiananmen Square and how it's remembered by Chinese people. Meditation We find out about a plan to make school a little more relaxing! In the last budget the government put money towards a program that teaches kids mindfulness and meditation. It's an ancient practice that, according to some experts, can have a big effect on your mental health. Camel Cuddles As far as pets go, camels might seem an unusual choice, but one family in Ipswich says their domestic dromedary is a great companion. They're encouraging other Aussies to adopt camels as a way of fighting Australia's feral pest problem. We find out more about Australia's wild camels and whether they could find a place in farmer's paddocks. Icy Adventure We meet two brothers, Monty and Ziggy, who have just come back from an epic overseas challenge. They set out to cross-country ski across the Arctic, even though they'd never skied before!

24:30 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Adani Update Adani is a word that you would have heard a lot if you've been listening to the news lately. It was a big issue during the recent election campaign and it's still causing a lot of debate. So what is it? We find out more about Adani, its plans for the Carmichael coal mine, and why it's been causing a lot of debate for a long time. Everest Debate For many, climbing the world's highest mountain is the ultimate achievement, but are too many taking on the peak? That's the question many are asking after a horror start to the climbing season. 11 people have died on Everest this year and last week an Australian man was rescued on its slopes. We find out why the mountain is so dangerous and why climbing it has become controversial. Place Names Some significant landmarks in Hobart could soon get some new names. As an act of reconciliation, the city council is thinking of adopting names in the language of the area's traditional owners - Palawa Kani. We look at how places get their names and why cities and towns around Australia are adopting Aboriginal names. Young Inventor We meet Max, a 13-year-old who's just won an international award for his high-tech compost bin. It's not the only thing Max has invented. He shows us some of his creations and tells us why he loves to solve problems with STEM. Eid Al-Fitr Next week millions of Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid Al-Fitr. It's an important Islamic holiday and marks the end of Ramadan. As part of our series looking at major religious holidays, we meet some kids who tell us about their religion and how they'll be celebrating Eid.

24:38 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Opinion Polls The recent federal election has many people asking big questions about opinion polls. They've been used for nearly 200 years to get an idea of how the public feels about their leaders but recently there've been some big votes around the world with very different results to what the opinion polls predicted. We look at how polls work and why they might be less accurate than they used to be. Mabo Legacy Next week is Reconciliation Week - a time to think about the shared history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-indigenous Australians. The week ends with Mabo Day on June 3, which celebrates the life and work of Eddie Mabo who fought to disprove terra nullius, the idea Australia was unoccupied before European colonisation. We look at the life and legacy of Mabo. Flu Season As the weather gets cooler, medical experts are warning people to get vaccinated to avoid getting the flu. They say this season has already been a particularly bad one. We find out what the flu is and how vaccinations can help to protect us. Underwater Research Scientists have been exploring the deep water off the coast of Tasmania and examining the fascinating creatures that live there. But before they did, they went to a local school to teach students about the weird world of the deep. Icy Adventure We meet two brothers, Monty and Ziggy, who have just come back from an epic overseas challenge. They set out to cross-country ski across the arctic, even though they'd never skied before!

24:31 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Extinction Report A new report has been released with some bad news for the creatures we share the planet with. It says more than a million of the world's species are at risk of extinction. It says that's worse than at any other time in human history, and it's mostly our fault. We look at what's at risk, why it's happening and what can be done. Ask Annabel Election Special (Part Three) With the election just around the corner, political expert Annabel Crabb answers some more questions from kids about voting and the political process. Royal Rule There have been a few big stories in the news recently featuring royalty. In the UK there was a new royal baby, Japan got a new emperor and in Thailand the new king was coronated. We look a bit closer at the tradition of royalty and find out where royals still reign and why. Instagram Likes Instagram is trialling a big change that could eventually have a big impact on social media. It's going to hide the number of likes that photos and videos have. The idea is to stop the app being used to judge people's popularity, which can have a big effect on people's mental health. We look at how "likes" can affect young people and find out what kids think about the changes. Sausage Sizzle history We finish this week's show with a fun look at an Australian election tradition; the "democracy sausage". Sausage sizzles have been a part of elections in Australia for a long time and Jack explores their interesting history.

24:31 | News and current affairs
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Behind the News

ABC Me

Parliament Anniversary May 9 is an important day in the history of Australian democracy. It's when Australia's first parliament was opened in Melbourne in 1901 and when Australia's old Parliament House opened in Canberra in 1927. With the federal election coming up Martin decided to travel back in time and look at the beginnings of Australia's government. Ask Annabel Election Special (Part Two) The second part of our election special featuring the ABC's election expert, Annabel Crabb, who's answered kids' questions about Aussie politics and how elections work. Capital Move One of Australia's closest neighbours could be about to get a new capital city! Indonesia's president has suggested that the government should thing about moving away from Jakarta because it's too busy, too polluted, and because it's sinking! Amelia finds out more about what's happening in Indonesia and why choosing capital cities can be a complicated business. Jazz Festival On Tuesday music lovers in Australia and around the world marked International Jazz Day. The celebrations are set to continue over the weekend as thousands of school kids take part in the Generations in Jazz Festival in Mount Gambier. Jack found out more about what jazz is, where it came from, and why it's still loved by people of all ages. Young Newshounds We meet some students from Ararat in Victoria who are keeping their town informed with their own local news service.

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